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Author Topic: Reading sheet music  (Read 1899 times)

Offline vheissu

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Reading sheet music
« on: December 13, 2007, 03:27:15 AM »
When I was younger, I took lessons in trombone (to this day, still the only instrument I had lessons in even though I can play a bit on everything) and got pretty far in the 3 years I was doing it (grade 5).
Obviously, to get this far, I needed to read music, and could do so fine.

However, I havn't played trombone since I was about 11. Now nearly 6 years of not reading music has made me forget it all.

Can any of you guys read music, and if so, can you give me any tips on how I can learn again??
I've been trying, using old books, but it isn't going brilliantly.

Thanks


Ben

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Offline cllvt

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Reading sheet music
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2007, 05:52:21 AM »
Hi Ben,

Well, I am sort of in the same boat as you.  I get to where I can read it pretty well, then go off and do tab for a few months, and when I return to traditional notation I am scratching my head again!

I have a chart from the back of Hal Leonard book that has the traditional notation and corresponding tab underneath it.  When I want to get back into reading music mode I pull out a copy I made of that sheet, and stick it on the music stand behind a song that I want to learn that is written in traditional notation.  Then I do my best, and refer to the cheat sheet when necessary, or figure it out on the fretboard myself.  For me, it starts off as a struggle ... learning a song makes it a little less painful.

Chris

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Chris

Music is the only language in which you cannot say a mean or sarcastic thing.
(quote by John Erskine)

Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind - Dr. Suess

Offline Mike Beatty

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Reading sheet music
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2007, 08:30:11 AM »
Here's a good document for those who are trying to learn to read standard notation.
http://www.johnmcgann.com/TabReadersGuideToStandard.pdf

One of my goals for the coming year is to be completely free from reliance on tab. I've got a good foundation in reading standard notation but it's hard to resist the siren song of tablature.
Mike Beatty
Customer Service Manager
U.S. Music Corp.

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Reading sheet music
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2007, 10:55:16 AM »
Looks like we are in the same boat then browndog, been busy studying for the last couple of months, and it looks like I will be studying some more from your link also.thanks.louis

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Offline gregjones

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Reading sheet music
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2007, 06:47:42 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by browndog

Here's a good document for those who are trying to learn to read standard notation.
http://www.johnmcgann.com/TabReadersGuideToStandard.pdf


Any instructional materila John McGann has produced is great.

He's teaches at the Berklee school of music and there aren't many people that play better than he does.

[:)]


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Offline KrisH

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Reading sheet music
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2007, 06:46:53 AM »
Hey Ben -- I learned how to read while learning to play trombone, too (and 5th grade when we started).  In the following 7 years I also picked up the baritone, tuba, electric and upright basses, and they were all notated in the bass clef.  So that's what I learned to read, and treble clef was like a different language to me.  When reading treble clef, I was always translating in my head (the note on this line is REALLY . . . .  Sight-reading that way was always impossible.

When needed, I could always brush up on sight-reading again pretty quickly.  Truth is, though, the only time I needed to sight-read extensively was while in school.  When I would play with community playhouse groups or lounge acts, there may be some note-specific passages, but for the most part, the bass tended to work with chord/rhythm charts, fake books, etc.  And cover bands always picked up our tunes by ear.

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Offline vermonter16

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Reading sheet music
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2007, 07:09:41 PM »
Hey - are guitar music and piano music similar?  I was thinking about getting back into the piano a bit and relearning how to read music before I launch into the guitar....though - after my husband gets his for Christmas....I might change my mind ;)
 

Offline vheissu

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Reading sheet music
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2007, 05:29:39 AM »
Cheers for the help guys. I checked out that site, and it seemed pretty good. I guess it's just going to take me some time.

Ben