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Author Topic: Folk Guitar?  (Read 2089 times)

Offline vermonter16

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Folk Guitar?
« on: December 30, 2007, 07:12:45 PM »
Hey all - I was just searching around on the Internet looking at guitars...  New Years Resolution - start learning to read music!  And I am wondering what the difference is between a dreadnought and a folk style guitar?  I know you all will know!
 

Offline 1 Cal

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Folk Guitar?
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2007, 08:11:08 PM »
Hey vermonter16

Here's a thread strumsalot started a while ago which should answer your question.
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Offline strumsalot

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Folk Guitar?
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2007, 10:19:29 AM »
Your husband's Alvarez is a dreadnought, it should be very similar to the size of my D82SW.

Folk-sized general rules: Smaller size, a little less volume, better for finger style picking than flat picking or strumming
« Last Edit: December 31, 2007, 12:53:05 PM by strumsalot »

Offline vermonter16

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Folk Guitar?
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2007, 11:46:08 AM »
Great - thanks for the info!  I knew you guys would know!
 

Offline YerDugliness

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Folk Guitar?
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2007, 12:32:03 PM »
Another thing I have noticed is that as the guitar body gets smaller, the nut (the slotted piece at the top of the fingerboard) gets wider.  Again, that is a characteristic that is more fingerstyle friendly.  Classical guitars, which are played almost exclusively fingerstyle, have fretboard nuts that are around 2 wide.

IMHO, a wider nut/fretboard makes learning the chords easier b/c it gives the learner more room in which to place the fingers and therefore lessens the errors that are part of learning.  If you are not making mistakes, you are not trying to improve, or so I've been told.  I made the error of buying a steel string guitar with a very narrow nut/fretboard early in my learning process--hated the damn thing so much that when it was stolen by a burglar I was not at all disturbed.  However, the same burglar also stole my first classical guitar, and if I'm ever lucky enough to meet him in a dark alley I'll break both of his hands for that eggregious act [:0] .

I know you've read it here before, Vermonter, but I'll say it again--before you buy, go to a music store and sit down with your husband and play a variety of guitars.  Most guitar stores have classical guitars and dreadnaught designs, they are the most common, but you might meed to search out a more specialized store to get the chance to play around with a folk guitar.  Pay attention to the width of the fretboard, at which fret the body of the guitar joins the ftetboard (most, but not all, steel strings join at the 14th fret, most if not all classical guitars join at the 12th fret), and how easily you can cradle the body of the guitar (including how comfortably your arm drapes over the body of the guitar).  The depth of the body has the most impact on that last feature, with folk and classical guitars being the most shallow, dreadnaughts being more deep, and jumbos having the greatest depth.

Get one that feels the best in your arms and you won't get discouraged as easily while you learn.  It's not a difficult process (if it were, I could never have managed, as I truly believe I don't have a musical bone in my body), but like any other endeavor there will be plateaus in the learning curve and that is when one can get discouraged.  Hang in there and you'll eventually get past the plateau--it continues to happen for me even after 35 years with one of these boxes with 6 strings in my hands.

We're all looking forward to hearing from you as you strike out on this enjoyable path--and if you involve your husband I predict it will be even more enjoyable--we have a few husband/wife teams here on the forum and I can attest that I really admire the togetherness they display.  Music is, after all, another language, another manner of communication!

Dugly [8D]

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« Last Edit: December 31, 2007, 07:23:49 PM by YerDugliness »
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Offline nogin007

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Folk Guitar?
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2008, 09:19:29 AM »
My Alvarez AF62 has a one and eleven-sixteenths nut, and it is listed as a folk guitar.
 

Offline vermonter16

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Folk Guitar?
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2008, 06:51:26 PM »
I think maybe in February after things settle down from the holiday and we get back from a cruise that we booked....gosh - almost two years ago :) I'll seriously go guitar shopping...I hope.

Right now I have a 9 month old kitty in the bedroom crying while my 5 others sit outside the door and get irritated with one another....arghhh...  Just so you all know - it was my husband's idea :)  Guess I better go sprinkle some catnip around :)

Thanks again for all the info.  I find it pretty interesting how guitars can be so different.