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Author Topic: Sad but true  (Read 5240 times)

Offline TRUK

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Sad but true
« on: May 07, 2009, 11:18:35 PM »
Hey, I need some encouragment or a kick in the pants! It seems since I got laid off in november I can't seem to get my head into practicing. This really is starting to bum me out and I need to do something about it because I just started learning to play 4 months before that. I sit around and talk to the wife which isn't a bad thing but I have plenty of time now to practice. Tell me something to get me going again------ Please!!!! You people have been my best insperation when I first started now I need you to get me going again!! Thanks, Truk.
 

Offline BlueBuddha

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Sad but true
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2009, 02:25:26 AM »
listen to the music you wish you could play, and ask yourself why you aren't trying to play it.

What do you want to do tomorrow?
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Offline Rocket

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Sad but true
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2009, 05:14:06 AM »
Give it up.
It's too hard.
You'll never learn.
It's too complicated.
You'll never master it so why bother.

(Now... prove me wrong!)

Offline Pete39577

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Sad but true
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2009, 06:43:23 AM »
Playing guitar is therepeutic to me.  When I have a lot of stress, I play more, to relieve the stress.  Pick up the guitar, sing to your wife, make her sing to you.  Play together.  It will make you feel better.  Then, try your best to find a new job so you wont have time to play.  You will then find time to play!
Good Luck!
Pete
Great Music from the Sunny south!

Offline cedwards

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Sad but true
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2009, 10:18:48 AM »
Forget any notion of mastering the intricate at the outset. The key is to build on simplicity.

Find a chord tab and learn a simple three-chord song that you REALLY like. Yell it out. The most motivating moments are those when you've just managed to play and sing a whole new song, end-to-end, from memory. Rather than worrying about sounding just like the original artist, make the song your own - play it the way it fits you. Give your new song a real ending.

Then learn another simple song. When you have a few simple songs in the pocket, start dressing up the ones you are most comfortable with - it will come naturally. Insert bass notes into your rhythm - they will fall into place quite easliy once you are comfortable with the song. Keep adding new, simple songs.

Get comfortable with simple chords and focus mostly on the strumming/picking hand. Rhythm is everything. It's amazing how far a few simple chords will carry you when you have a variety of strong rhythms available (i.e. at least 50% of rock 'n' roll, country, folk etc.). Rocking out is FUN!

For the chording hand, start with simple chords and focus on getting your pressure as light as possible - that will improve the flow of chord changes. For both hands, think SMOOTHETIVITY!

The song is the thing - people like to hear songs that they know (and can sing along with). Find your singing voice. Play and sing for a friendly audience. Playing alone all the time (especially aimless, self-satisfying noodling) can be deadly but putting yourself out there is a powerful motivator and can be hugely satisfying.

Remember this - most people hear the song, NOT your mistakes. If you give them the whole package -- no matter how simple it is -- they will like it, especially if they can sing along. If you screw up, finish the song anyway - every time.

So you may have to practice alone during the day but turn your practice into getting prepared to do a decent job when playing with friends or for a friendly audience - that's a real goal. Then play with friends whenever you can - it doesn't matter if everyone starts out sucking. You'll all get better faster. Group music is FUN!

Make it FUN!

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Offline cedwards

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Sad but true
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2009, 10:26:27 AM »
If you're inclined that way at all, a classic boom-chukka-boom-chukka Johnny Cash tune is a great place to start.

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Offline magoo99

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Sad but true
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2009, 12:17:58 PM »
Find someone to play with That play a little better or has a wee bit more skill then you.[so you will learn]...then take the time to jam with him/her..If the want is there to play you will and get excited about learning.

I have aways Played in a Celtic band ..last yr it got boring for me so I joined a country Bluegrass band..I learned a lot of new stuff and It got my Interests back into music.
Good Luck
Magoo
 

Offline cedwards

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Sad but true
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2009, 03:03:32 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by luvmyshiner
One of the things my lovely child bride and I do is keep a guitar near us at all times.



Heartily concur! While keeping guitar in the case properly humidified has its obvious benefits, there's nothing quite like a lovely guitar, sitting on her stand in a room you're always in, just begging you to play her. And 10 * two minutes = 20 minutes: those commercials add up.

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Offline TRUK

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Sad but true
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2009, 07:37:34 PM »
Thanks, I know I could count on the people on this board to get me going again and to give me some great ideas. Going to learn a new song and keep my Washburn right near me. And now I have a challenge too, eh Rocket!! Thanks, Truk.
 

Offline Rocket

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Sad but true
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2009, 08:00:27 PM »
Correct... now play or pass!

Offline Strummer71

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Sad but true
« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2009, 06:45:25 AM »
When I'm learning something, I like to check out Youtube to see how others are playing the song.
There are often many different versions and skill levels on display, and many of them are the player's own version which they have adapted to their own liking. It also demonstrates that while there is a lot of talent out there, most of us are in fact not vertuoso performers.
It doesn't have to sound exactly like the origional to be great.

Take a tip from Neil Young, quoted in another post:
http://forums.washburn.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=15004&SearchTerms=quotes,from,neil,young
« Last Edit: May 17, 2009, 02:05:16 AM by Strummer71 »
My Guitars:
Washburn J58SW Timbercraft
Washburn10S
http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu195/Strummer63/P4010002.jpg

Offline Quinn Spalpeen

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Sad but true
« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2009, 03:57:55 PM »
Shiner has the simplest and most sure way of encouraging yourself to practice.  Keep the guitars (or any other instruments) out of the case (or with case at least open) in the rooms you spend the most time in. In your face, so to speak. You may find that it is irresistible, I do.  That works for me very well, and don't hold yourself to a routine or obligatory amount of time, or technique, pick it up only to have fun. At least until your desire is firmly back in place, then you can start with 'studying' new stuff. Just noodle around. But always make sure the guitar is there, in your face, ready to play with nothing to do but pick it up. (Being always in tune etc.)

Whenever you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however  improbable, must be the Truth .... Sherlock Holmes

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Nothing under the sun is new Watson. .... Sherlock Holmes

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Offline Quinn Spalpeen

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Sad but true
« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2009, 01:04:09 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by luvmyshiner

I'm all for taking care of your equipment, and keeping your guitars cased.  



Read me with more care, shiner, that's exactly what I said. out of the case, or at least with the case open  That's how I live, much to the consternation of the cleaning staff.

Whenever you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however  improbable, must be the Truth .... Sherlock Holmes

Trinity College Bouzouki
SX STL 62BSB
Washburn WD114S
Washburn J4
Scott Cao STV-950 (Hellier model)
Eastman Master Model 905 (Stradivari model)
Fender FV-3
Marshall AS50D


Nothing under the sun is new Watson. .... Sherlock Holmes

Washburn F10S (From Funky Munky, no G.C. stuff for me.)
Martin 00-15
Martin 000-28
Trinity College Bouzouki
Raul Emiliani Model 928 (Stradivari model)
Scott Cao STV-950 (Hellier model)
Eastman Master Model 905 (Stradivari model)
Roland F-110

Offline classicallady

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Sad but true
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2009, 06:45:27 PM »
I always found that my guitar hanging on the wall (like any great work of art) did the trick.  When your gaze goes to it, as it always does, you just can't help but pluck it off the wall and enjoy it all over again.  If you keep it in it's case, or even on a stand, you can get used to it just being another piece of furniture.  Hanging it on the wall keeps it spotlighted.  Just make sure the wall hook is secured properly and is the right fit for your guitar neck, and of course keep it out of the sun and on an interior wall. The other thing to do is to go over what you've learned in your mind as you are going to sleep - in that semi-altered state of awareness - something subliminal happens.  -classicallady
???/???

Offline marcus

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Sad but true
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2009, 07:14:26 AM »
I teach guitar. My cousin approached me a couple of months ago about getting lessons. I had taught him 15 years ago on and off but he never really applied himself. This time it was different, he had split from his wife and needed some therapy....not being a pyschologist I suggested getting back into guitar. I explained the therapeutic value (sorry for the spelling) and bingo it has been the best thing he could have done.
He know says that without it he would have been a mess. His progress has been remarkable both playing wise and getting over the split. He puts it down to being able to take time out and play, that special time when you think about nothing else but the sound you are creating. It's a wonderful thing. Play, create, enjoy!