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Author Topic: Speaking of old warped Washburns  (Read 1552 times)

Offline Lunaray

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Speaking of old warped Washburns
« on: November 16, 2009, 09:56:34 PM »
Mine is!

When I got my old 5200 eons ago my guitar teacher suggested that I put nylon strings on her 'cause her neck was warped and nylons would relieve some of the tension.  What can be done about a warped neck on these old parlors?  I would really like to have some work done on her so I can play her again and I don't even know what she will sound like with steel strings, but I'm sure it will be better than she sounds now.  Just how would a Luthier go about fixing her up and making her playable again, what would they do?

Ray
 
Antique Washburn Parlor, Model 5200

Music is best when it's played around a campfire!
Ray
 
Antique Washburn Parlor, Model 5200

Music is best when it's played around a campfire!

Offline spt

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Speaking of old warped Washburns
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2009, 08:41:39 AM »
It's called heat and press... Heating the whole neck till the hide glue softens, and then pressing it so the 2 surfaces bind back along a flat (instead of curved) plane. Doesn't always work but worth a try to avoid more major surgery.
 

ship of fools

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Speaking of old warped Washburns
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2009, 09:48:25 AM »
Hi Ray I have heard of folks trying the method SPT has mentioned but to be honest with you I have never heard of it being done successfully to a guitar doesn't mean it hasn't been done, so I found this old refrence. http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/neckrepair2.htm
Another thing I have heard done is were they remove the fret board and steam the neck and place a truss rod down a center channel that they made, but that strikes me as being extremely expensive process.
But I am old school when it comes to wood and tend to think that if the wood has changed on the neck it will eventually go back to it again, how soon one can never tell, maybe really quick or it could take another 20 years, most woods have a mind of their own.Ship

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Offline Pike

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Speaking of old warped Washburns
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2009, 01:40:54 PM »
I had it done once. Lasted four months. By six months the neck was right back where it started. And this on a baseball bat of a neck on an old Guild...
 

Offline Lunaray

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Speaking of old warped Washburns
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2009, 02:32:16 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by Pike

I had it done once. Lasted four months. By six months the neck was right back where it started. And this on a baseball bat of a neck on an old Guild...


Yeah, I suspect that what you and Ship are telling me is true, wood does have a mind of its' own and you can't force it to behave differently, behavior modification might work with people, but not with wood, least not without some drastic intervention like the addition of a truss rod.  That's my guitar psychoanalysis for the day!

Actually, the warp isn't real bad so maybe just a fret job would help, I've never had a good Luthier even look at her, so maybe something not too drastic can be done to improve things.  Thanks guys!

Ray
 
Antique Washburn Parlor, Model 5200

Music is best when it's played around a campfire!
« Last Edit: November 17, 2009, 02:34:13 PM by Lunaray »
Ray
 
Antique Washburn Parlor, Model 5200

Music is best when it's played around a campfire!