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Author Topic: question about intonation and stings  (Read 5789 times)

Offline el_xero

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question about intonation and stings
« on: July 29, 2010, 09:52:47 PM »
Hi I've been reading a little and it seems that every where people speak about intonating, they always seem to want to use fresh strings some go as far as saying if your strings are any older than 4 hours don't bother intonating? Why is it the case that one must use new strings for this? New strings need time to stretch doens't this affect the intonation settings?
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Offline Rocket

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2010, 10:18:22 PM »
String stretch has nothing to do with intonation but is adjusted away with tuning machines. If the guitar actually physically stretches in length (why not!)... that would definitely affect intonation.

Intonation is about wavelength matching chromatic reference pitches of the natural musical scale temperaments by adjusting string lengths at the bridge... not about the physical age of materials.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2010, 10:52:00 PM by Rocket »

Offline el_xero

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2010, 08:38:08 PM »
Alright, Rocket that makes sense but why do they always talk about using new strings? that part makes zero sense to me.
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Offline boynamedsuse

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2010, 12:37:14 PM »
Maybe it is because old (ready to toss) strings won't stay intonated. The extension should be pretty much gone out of the strings if they are wrapped around the tuning posts properly and given a mild stretch or subjected to some bending for a few minutes while tuning. Once the strings stay in tune, you should be in the ballpark with regard to being ready to set up the guitar's intonation.
 

Offline Dreadman

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2010, 08:53:58 AM »
The reason we want newer strings when intonating is that old strings, due to corrosion and gunk build up, don't tune as accurately - and accurate tuning is paramount to accurate intonation.
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Offline el_xero

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2010, 12:18:01 PM »
Right-oh! Gotchya thanks guys :) sorry It took me eons to get back on here.. my monitor went pop hmm :(
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Offline GearManDude

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2010, 12:44:03 AM »
i dont know about this.. i really dont think string age has much to do with the intonation. they are 2 separate things. the string tension may change but the distance between the saddle and the nut(intonation) will stay the same.
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Offline NickS

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2010, 10:47:00 PM »
Dude - When the strings are stretched and old they loose tone. The steel looses it's ability to vibrate as much as it did when new - it's called metal fatigue. Thus dead tone = Tone readings that may be off on ones meter.

A Luthier will always insist on putting new strings on a guitar prior to intonation of said instrument.

 

Offline el_xero

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2010, 08:10:11 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by NickS

Dude - When the strings are stretched and old they loose tone. The steel looses it's ability to vibrate as much as it did when new - it's called metal fatigue. Thus dead tone = Tone readings that may be off on ones meter.

A Luthier will always insist on putting new strings on a guitar prior to intonation of said instrument.





alright this may seem stupid but clear me up perhaps I'm thinking incorrectly about this. I'm of the opin that new strings are constantly stretching so in my pee brain I'm thinking that while you have brand new strings on there and doing your settings, that your settings could be wrong considering that they may be stretching right under your nose. Kinda like why you have to keep retuning the darn thing till it sticks when its fully stretched and settled. I dunno maybe I've worked it out wrong in my head, as I know its the distance thats really important
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Offline Rocket

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2010, 08:28:29 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by el_xero

...pee brain...
I know its the distance thats really important

(I'm sure you meant pea brain!)
Correct... it's the physical distance and unchanging physical laws of the universe that prevail.

Offline NickS

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2010, 08:26:32 PM »
Brain tease time.......

If my guitar's intonation is perfect with 9's. Why would I have to change it when I put 11's on?
 

Offline Rocket

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2010, 08:40:33 PM »
Answer: Heavier tension on neck slightly shortens distance between nut & saddle. Adjust truss rod to keep neck flat.
Better question: If your intonation is perfect with 9's... why are you jumping to 11's?

(I know you're trying hard to make a point... but it's a false point. Physical laws are pretty set on the issue.)

Offline NickS

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2010, 09:10:43 PM »
The thickness of the string gauge also plays a part. No two sets of strings are perfectly the same gauge. Manufacturers have a tolerance, even ISO 9600 compliant factories. That is why intonation should be checked and adjusted every time you change strings. Why anyone would intonate a guitar with worn out strings is besides me. I have had a few dead strings right out of a new pack, not the whole pack just one string that just sounds off.

I'll put new strings on and stretch them and stretch them and keep tuning it up. play it for a while then let it settle in overnight. Stretch and tune till it's solid, then check intonation and adjust from there.

 

Offline NickS

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question about intonation and stings
« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2010, 09:26:14 PM »
I don't play with 9's Rocket, 10's and 11's is what I like to use. My Strat is liking 11's since the day I bought my first one.