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Author Topic: New Member, New Player  (Read 3399 times)

Offline superk

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« on: August 28, 2010, 06:54:25 PM »
Hi, I'm a new member, and a new player, and I just bought the X-Series to hopefully fulfill a long-time dream of mine to play guitar. Would it be practical for me to learn how to on my own with the help of instructional materials and DVD's, or do you think that I should take lessons? Or maybe a bit of both?

Kevin, 47-year old guitar newbie.
Kevin, 48-year old guitar newbie.

Offline boynamedsuse

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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2010, 07:15:35 PM »
Welcome to the forum. I've done a bit of both and would recommend it. What works better for each person depends on their schedule, how fast they learn, how much time they want to put into playing each day or week, how they best learn, how easily they are frustrated, etc. If you try both, you will know what works better for you and perhaps use one to augment the other.
 

Offline siggie30

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« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2010, 05:02:26 PM »
Noodle and strum until your comfortable with the location of strings. If you ever get to the point you feel your not progressing, then entertain the idea of lessons. Unfortunately, many people learn wrong from the beginning on position, style, ect. It is your money and time, so if you feel you would be better served learning from lessons, then buy  a 3 month term and go from there. Just my .02
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Offline superk

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« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2011, 09:50:35 AM »
Something I've been noticing recently is that there seem to be a few sweet spots on the fretboard that seem to be where the best rock guitar sound is produced: In between the second and fourth frets, the fifth and seventh, and the twelth and fifteenth. Is there a musical reason for this?

Kevin, 47-year old guitar newbie.
Kevin, 48-year old guitar newbie.

Offline greygoose625

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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2011, 09:39:44 AM »
Lessons or wing it on your own.  What are your goals with the guitar?  Are you around anybody that can help?

Taking lessons is only good if you find a good teacher that will guide you on the proper path.  I've taught since 1964 and had many students come to me from other teachers that didn't know how to teach guitar properly.  I've had self-taught students that were very accomplished.

Taking lessons can save time and grief......but, even with a great teacher, lessons are   effective only if you are willing to do the work......janeguitar.com

 

Offline Quinn Spalpeen

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« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2011, 05:35:28 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by superk

Something I've been noticing recently is that there seem to be a few sweet spots on the fretboard that seem to be where the best rock guitar sound is produced: In between the second and fourth frets, the fifth and seventh, and the twelth and fifteenth. Is there a musical reason for this?


Without going into much deep theory, simply put, it's not so much a spot on the fretboard that is 'sweet' to you.  Music is about the relative differences in pitch.  What note follows (or precedes) what note is the 'sweetness' you are hearing.  A C4 is a C4 regardless of where it's played. (With some esoteric and not so practical exceptions.)  Some intervals are pleasing to the ear, some not so much, it depends on the genre. Always think in terms of what comes next/before, not single isolated tones.

My advise on lessons?  Be as sure as you can of your 'potential' teacher's bona fides.  And be perfectly willing to change teachers if you feel there is no connect with them.  (And my personal biggie, Don't forego learning theory, the more you know, the quicker you will master.) Digital Piano
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Offline cbrady2140

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« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2011, 10:57:21 AM »
Kevin,

I started playing at 49.  As mid-life crises go, this is a pretty good one to have.  I went the self-taught route for about 9 months, then my wife bought me guitar lessons for Christmas (maybe she was trying to tell me something!).  

I took lessons for about 2 1/2 years and it made a huge difference in my playing.  I've still got a lot to learn (and it's a little harder to get the brain cells to learn new stuff in my 50s), but it's remarkable that I have come as far as I have in 4 years.  

Regards,

CB
 

Offline superk

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« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2011, 07:30:08 AM »
CB, thanks for your comments. I did sign up for lessons with an instructor who's about the same age as me, plays part-time professionally, and likes a lot of the same music as I do. I'm wishing now that I had more knowledge of the basics of music theory, or even a background in a similar instrument, but unfortunately I don't, so a part of the lessons is spent on music theory, chords, and scales.

Kevin, 47-year old guitar newbie.
Kevin, 48-year old guitar newbie.