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Author Topic: Buzz Feiten Tuning  (Read 8464 times)

Offline gregjones

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Buzz Feiten Tuning
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2010, 03:22:14 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by Rocket

quote:
Originally posted by boynamedsuse

I fall into the Buzz Feiten works camp.

Small camp... I only see the short bus parked there these days.



Surely you don't mean that Special ED one, do you??
If it's got tuners, tits, or tires----it's gonna cost you.

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Offline Quinn Spalpeen

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Buzz Feiten Tuning
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2010, 09:29:05 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by mcloud10

Quote
It is possible to tune a piano into the perfect 4th and fifth in one key only, but then all the other keys are out of tune.  The reality is that temperment tuning is a compromise - essentially setting all 12 tones to the same degree of inharmonicity.  It's inescapable on a piano - or on a guitar.

One interesting fact:  When a quartet sings, they tend to sing to the perfect intervals, that is, they tend to tune to a perfect third, fourth, or fifth with each other.  When singing with a piano, they have to modify their intervals if they want to sing in tune with the piano.  Otherwise they sound out of tune with it.




Please, please, please be careful with the terminology. Basicly you are correct, but the perfect fourth, and the perfect fifth are carried through out the range. That's why they are called perfect.  THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A PERFECT THIRD!!! It's a major 3rd, a minor 3rd or aug or dim 3rd, never a perfect 3rd...  

Remember the 3:4:5 triangle.

They are not the 3rd, 4th, and fifth intervals, they are the sides of a right triangle. A ratio,,, I wish I could draw on these pages,,,, one side (3) is 5/12ths of an octave (the perfect 4th),, one side (4) is 7/12ths of an octave (the perfect 5th) and the last side (5) is 12/12ths of an octave (an octave). They are called perfect because they will give exact numbers (numbers which don't carry an endless string of fractions.)  The only right triangle in the universe which does so. 3:4:5 Digital Piano
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Offline mcloud10

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Buzz Feiten Tuning
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2010, 09:20:14 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by Quinn Spalpeen

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A PERFECT THIRD!!! It's a major 3rd, a minor 3rd or aug or dim 3rd, never a perfect 3rd...  




Sorry!  I do know a bit of theory, but I'm sure my terms and definitions could use a more thorough understanding.

Thanks for clarifying. [:)]

Mark

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Offline Junior88

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Buzz Feiten Tuning
« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2010, 12:53:30 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by Rocket

quote:
Originally posted by boynamedsuse

I fall into the Buzz Feiten works camp.

Small camp... I only see the short bus parked there these days.


I really wish this forum had a 'like' button like the one that's on Facebook for posts like this one! [8D]