Username: Password:

Author Topic: advice on barr chords  (Read 11756 times)

Offline Washburn5

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 14
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« on: January 19, 2005, 08:04:46 AM »
hey i've been playing for a little over a year, and i have still not tried to take on barr chords, i would apreciate any tips on good chords to start out with or any advice on them in general.
thanks
 

Offline markmilly

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 29
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2005, 04:35:05 PM »
two very basic barre forms are the e-shape and a-shape
take an e chord played with your2, 3, 4 fingers and slide it up a fret.  bar the strings behind it on the first fret and you have an f chord.  move it up two more and you have a g chord......you can do the same with the baisc a chord position at the headstock and slide it up just the same........
Down to my last.....

Offline Washburn5

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 14
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2005, 06:54:32 AM »
im going to try whatyou said(markmilly). if you or eny one else has any other input,i'm open.
 

Offline jackhammer

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2005, 08:32:46 AM »
I've been playing for one year myself and find barre chords very challenging. What I try to do is to fret the single chords first and lay down the bar immediately thereafter. It seems to work for me, if I am explaining it corectly. I have just recently mastered the F and B. Good luck! It's a lot of fun and a lot of work. I wish I took this up 25 years ago!!!
 

Offline MZDA

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2005, 12:54:31 PM »
I've been playing for around 8 years... with bar chords i usually have my finger sort of rotate so it's not flat but somewhat on it's side.. I find it easier to do it this way because it's easier to fret the bar and you don't have to push down as hard
 

Offline rkmusic

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 14
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2005, 07:50:57 PM »
I would just play them untill your hand hurts and then do it again as soon as the ache stops. You will slowly build up endurance and be able to play about 85% of any rock music you have ever heard.
My real advise is to slap your first finger across the whole fret  board(like a capo), flat and start that way, then add the other fingers, arching them.

Offline Styles

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 227
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2005, 11:25:22 AM »
I Found it easier to practice around the 5th fret sice it doesn't take as much finger pressure to sound those bar cords... as these sound good move it closer to the nut.....

When they sound good its easier to practice longer than struggling with the tough ones first...

Rock On....[8D]
 

Offline vangoghsear

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 23
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2007, 06:34:19 AM »
Learn a song that has one or two in it.  For me it was Pink Floyd's Comfortably Numb.  I wanted to learn it and it had a Bm in it.  Then I learned Hotel California, it had a Bm and a F#m.  Play that part of the  song until the change is smooth, in and out of the bar chord.
Idol WI67PROQ

Offline radenshirinji

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 357
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2010, 11:35:26 PM »
Sometimes when I play those chords, one or two of the strings do not sound properly, especially when my fingers are tired.
 

Offline cedwards

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 820
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2010, 12:31:05 PM »
http://www.justinguitar.com/en/CH-006-BasicBarres.php

Check it! Work through the videos lower down the page. There is no substitute for LOTS of practice to build strength, callouses and and technique. Find at least 15 minutes EVERY day. Also have a look at the finger gymnastics section of the same site.
Seize the Fish
*****
WG2S, D10SCE, WI45, JM300S, Lyon L115
'70s Univox LP Copy


Offline cedwards

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 820
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2010, 12:45:11 PM »
Also, I'm a big proponent of playing songs rather than just noodling. It's WAY more fun, both for you and those around you.

So find a good simple barre chord song to play so as to build the required strength. Good Lovin' would be a great start. It's basically just moving the E chord form up and down the neck. That is; open E (2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers), E-form barre A and E-form barre B and then back down, through barre A to the open E. Repeat ad nauseam. Up and down, up and down, up and down. Start slowly and gradually work it up to speed.

By the time you can do that, you will have sufficient strength. Having said that, once you start to get a bit of comfort, focus on doing the fretting with as light a touch as you can while still keeping the notes clear. Avoid the death grip that will freeze you into place. The lighter your touch, the easier it is to move the chords fluidly and, eventually, the better your tone will become.

Once you are there, a good song to slip in a minor barre chord form is All Along the Watchtower. Basically, that just involves lifting the second finger off the E-form barre chord to get the minor chord form. So . . . Am (E-form barre A with second finger lifted), down to E-form barre G and down again to E-form barre F). Up and down, up and down . . . you get it. If you go with the Dave Matthews version, it's about as good a natural high as you can get. Let 'er WAIL!
« Last Edit: July 22, 2010, 12:55:05 PM by cedwards »
Seize the Fish
*****
WG2S, D10SCE, WI45, JM300S, Lyon L115
'70s Univox LP Copy


Offline radenshirinji

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 357
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #11 on: July 22, 2010, 08:55:15 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by cedwards

Also,
By the time you can do that, you will have sufficient strength. Having said that, once you start to get a bit of comfort, focus on doing the fretting with as light a touch as you can while still keeping the notes clear. Avoid the death grip that will freeze you into place. The lighter your touch, the easier it is to move the chords fluidly and, eventually, the better your tone will become.





Thanks for the tips.
 

Offline YerDugliness

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3080
  • Pearl, TX jams at: www.pearlbluegrass.com/
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2011, 07:53:29 AM »
My best advice would be two-fold:

First, learn to make the cowboy chords (first position chords) with not only the 1,2,3 fingers, but also with the 2,3,4 fingers FROM THE BEGINNING.  This sort of flexibility makes the switch to barre chords much easier when the fingers are already programmed to form the chord correctly.....eliminates a the learning curve associated with switching to the 2,3,4 fingers.

Second, base the determination on whether to use barre chords on the chords immediately preceeding and following the chord in question.  At times during the same song I will play the same chord both in open form and in barre form, it really depends on how easy it is to get to the barre chord from the preceeding chord as well as how easy it is to get from the barre chord to the following chord.  A splendid example of this is the G chord....many of my songs seem to use this (G and D are my favorite keys).....I'll play with an open G and a barred G (using the E formation with fingers 2,3,4 barred at the 3rd fret) in the same song....

Barre chords are an intermediate issue....if you're a beginning player, don't feel bad if you have trouble with barre chords (particularly if you've made the 1st position chords with only the 1,2,3 fingers, as do most beginners).

Cheers from.....

Dugly [8D]

YerDugliness, Esq./Post No Bills
Guitar Playin' FOOL, retired & attempting to age disgracefully!!
Washburns: WD32SW, D61SW, and C124SW
Other fine acoustic guitars by Breedlove (custom shop Revival Series 000), Darren Hippner (#506), Takamini (2005 LTD), Epiphone (Masterbilt AJ500RC), and Yamaha (G231-II)

YerDugliness,Esq./Post No Bills
Guitar Playin' FOOL, attempting to age disgracefully!
Washburns:WD32SW,D61SW,C124SWK,WMJ21S(2),WGO26SCE, WMJ11S(now gifted),WSJ60SKELITE,WG26S.
Other fine acoustics:Breedlove custom shop 000,Hippner #506 Hauser,Takamini 2005 LTD,Epi Masterbilt AJ500RC

Offline Ripple

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 130
    • View Profile
advice on barr chords
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2011, 10:12:51 AM »
Learn the caged template then you can begin to understand the various ways chords are played up the neck with different shapes and voicings Desi Serna explains this beautifully in his fret board theory series I highly reccomend it as did rolling stone mag.good luck
Washburn D26S Washburn D60SW  Washburn F15 Alvarez Yairi DYK75P American Standard Srat Buffet R13