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Author Topic: future of guitar  (Read 2485 times)

Offline greygoose625

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future of guitar
« on: January 21, 2011, 10:19:00 AM »
I've played and taught guitar all my life.  The changes I've seen are alarming when taking into consideration the evolution of the guitar.....the guitar and music isn't static and the guitar's evolution is changing fast.  I've used every opportunity to promote an interest in guitar and music to children.....over the past 40 years I've let thousands of children play my Washburn Hauser classical guitar at schools , after concerts & in resturants.  Children are the future of the guitar.......and many consider Guitar Hero as playing guitar..........with all the electronic toys and instant result simulated instruments it appears that the guitar will end up in the closet next to the accordian ans suffer the same fate as the lute..........the age of my audience at my concerts is alarming.......mostly seniors and no teenagers with few middle age people......when I started a guitar concert always filled the hall with young people interested in playing guitar.  I'm doing everything I can to get youth interested in guitars to insure the guitar will have a future........janeguitar.com
 

Offline Rocket

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future of guitar
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2011, 10:45:41 AM »
Meh... I wouldn't be too overly concerned. Toys are toys, real is real.
 
There have always been toys around simulating instruments. I had a Mickey Mouse plastic guitar with a crank in the side when I was a tot. I also had an Operation game but never confused it with actual surgery, (heh-heh... remove wishbone.)
Electronic technology makes them widely accepted but the actual difference is that the simulated version is devoid of creativity. When creativity blossoms everyone grabs an actual instrument of their muse.

Offline Pike

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future of guitar
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2011, 11:42:59 AM »
quote:
I'm doing everything I can to get youth interested in guitars to insure the guitar will have a future
Right on Jane, I'm with you there...
 

Offline YerDugliness

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future of guitar
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2011, 06:13:07 PM »
Jane, I'd agree with you.  While it may seem like a simple instrument, a box with only 6 strings (for the most part), learning to play the guitar (which, IMHO is different from learning to play songs on a guitar) is a daunting task.

I have a friend who is a world class concert tropical guitarist (his term, he absolutely abhors the one-upmanship that is prevalent in the field of classical guitar)....he tells me about people he doesn't even know who show up on his doorstep, insisting on a lesson, as if by their own self-imposed importance they are entitled to be taught in a few moments what it has taken this gentleman a lifetime to master.

It's a generational thing, IMHO.  Guitar Hero enables the young of this generation to feel like they are making music, but in reality it's little more than playing air guitar.  I once agreed to teach a beginners class to a small group of 7th and 8th graders, and you can imagine my surprise when not a one of them wanted to even learn how to tune the guitar to a standard tuning, much less learn the musical scale and a few major chords.  They all, to a student, were more than willing to stand up and mimic their own personal guitar hero, though.....

It's all about learning how to persevere in the face of adversity.  This younger generation, for the most part, seems to think that if you can hold a guitar, you can play it.  My daughter is as guilty as the rest--in her 3rd year of high school she and a few friends wanted to form a little group, and she asked me to teach her how to play the guitar.  She had been listening to me for all her life and I guess she figured it would be easy.  She gave up on the 3rd lesson.  It was hard and her attitude was that if it was that hard, then it wasn't worth sticking with.

I do see child prodigies now and then, at one of the venues where I play at open-mic night there is a 14 year old youngster who can do SRV almost as well as SRV, himself....but there's only one of those, and how many gave up on the 3rd lesson when they realized how hard it would be.

I approached the county Recreation department where I grew up about a year ago with a couple of beginner quality classical guitars that I wanted to donate if they had any use for them.  They declined....I guess there was no demand for guitar lessons as a recreational activity. In the end I gave them to two young ladies who seemed interested, but I'm told that only one of them has progressed to the point where she can play a simple song now, the other proudly displays hers in the stand I gave her but never uses it.  Go figure.....

Cheers from.....

Dugly [8D]

YerDugliness, Esq./Post No Bills
Guitar Playin' FOOL, retired & attempting to age disgracefully!!
Washburns: WD32SW, D61SW, and C124SW
Other fine acoustic guitars by Breedlove (custom shop Revival Series 000), Darren Hippner (#506), Takamini (2005 LTD), Epiphone (Masterbilt AJ500RC), and Yamaha (G231-II)

YerDugliness,Esq./Post No Bills
Guitar Playin' FOOL, attempting to age disgracefully!
Washburns:WD32SW,D61SW,D62SW,C124SWK,
WMJ21S(2),WGO26SCE,WSJ60SKELITE,WG26S (2).
Other fine acoustics:Breedlove custom shop 000,Hippner #506 Hauser,Takamini 2005 LTD,Epi Masterbilt AJ500RC

Offline NeilSlough

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future of guitar
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2011, 08:19:19 AM »
You know. I'm not that worried about the guitar as I am about Music overall. Every Genre of music is actually deteriorating. Rock, Metal, jazz everything !! It so hard to find good music nowdays.. Its really disappointing !
« Last Edit: January 04, 2012, 11:24:42 AM by NeilSlough »