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Author Topic: Help ID my Washburn  (Read 3581 times)

Offline kurt_rad

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Help ID my Washburn
« on: March 07, 2011, 12:10:13 PM »
I am very new to this site, but it seemed to be the best spot to get some info on a guitar that I recently inherited.

I picked up a Washburn classical(?) guitar with model no# WN50 and I believe the serial # to be 2776 both printed on paper inside the sound hole. I have not been able to find any information on this guitar anywhere.

Any information you can provide is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Kurt
 

Offline Pike

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Help ID my Washburn
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2011, 12:59:13 PM »
Hi Kurt, haven't heard of that one and it doesn't show in the blue book. Got any pics?
 

Offline kurt_rad

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Help ID my Washburn
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2011, 01:50:05 PM »
I will grab some tonight and post them when I get a chance.
 

Offline wn50 d10s12 h1260 ej200

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Help ID my Washburn
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2011, 04:40:38 PM »
Hey,there,Kurt.I joined this forum after seeing your WN50 question.I have been looking for info on mine (ser.#1510)since my wife bought it from a friend whose dad had passed away in the '90's.All i can let you know is it's from the Beckmen Music Group of Los Angeles years,which places the manufacture mid-'70's to early '80's.A fan of all things stringed and all things wooden ,who i count as a friend,told me my wife got lucky when she scored this gift for me.In his words,the country of manufacture was unknown,but the build quality was beyond reproach.It is a classical guitar,all solid woods.It's old growth cedar topped,the back appears to be (gasp!) Brazilian Rosewood,mahogany sides,and mahogany neck.He was under the impression that this particular model may have been marketed in Canada as a higher end classical instrument.My friend in Ontario said the non-matching back and sides,and oddly different rosewood fingerboard with a brighter rosewood,or even possibly tulipwood bridge may have prompted Beckmen to keep this batch of instruments for export markets.
He has confirmed my belief that this guitar has wooden bindings,and yet apparently synthetic nut and saddle.He has a standing offer to injure me if I ever sell this guitar to somebody other than him.This is the LOUDEST classical guitar i have ever heard,and I don't normally use a pick.It's a beautiful,rich,clear sounding instrument with fabulous sustain.
If you're a hobbyist,ignore the dollar value,play what I think you are lucky to have,put some D'addario
Pro-Arte strings on 'er.Enjoy the heck out of it for years to come,and pass it on for future generations to love a great instrument without the need for a museum piece price of a Gibson or Martin.
And it's a great looking guitar,too!A win for you,me,and Washburn.Of,course,if you're willing to give me one of those Gibson or Martin museum pieces,I'd see to it that it wouldn't suffer any neglect.
wn50,d10s12,h1260,ej200

Offline kurt_rad

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Re: Help ID my Washburn
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2012, 03:43:33 PM »
That is my guitar described to a tee. I don't really play and recently moved.and there is a great program in town that donates instruments to children who can't afford them otherwise. This is where mine went. It has been put back into use which is the important thing.