Washburn Acoustic Guitars Forums > Southwest Series

Washburn D46SCE how does it play?

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tomana:
Hi,

I'm a noobie at Washburn forums and it looks to be a nice place here.

I just bought a 1999 D46SCE on ebay and should arrive next week. I've never played this model and so I was wondering ...

- where can I get detailed specs for this year/model ?
- what other make/model would you say feels the closest to play on (action height, neck width, overall feel of holding and playing, etc)?
- Is there anything specific to this model and time period that I should know of, good or not so good ?
- The fretboard has a bit of gunk on it, standard buildup; what's the best way to remove it ?
- Does Washburn recommend oiling the fretboard and if so, what type and brand ?

Thanks for any replies { 8^ D

YerDugliness:
Welcome to the forum, tomana!

I did a search for D46SCE and came up with a boatload of threads, but as I reviewed them I thought this one might give you some of the information you seek:

http://forums.washburn.com/index.php/topic,19715.msg129892/topicseen.html#msg129892

The information at the top of the thread refers to the model about which you asked...I notice the photos are gone (the thread was posted by a dealer), but it does give some of the specs you mentioned.

Value might be a subjective issue...hopefully Evenkeel or Pike will come along with some info from the blue-book.

As for which other models it might play like...I sure wouldn't know because I have never played one, but if my WD32S (a lower level model that the D46SW, not a CE model) was any indication, I think you'll like it...sure wish I had mine back  :'(

Also try this link.  It looks promising...you search for info based on the date of manufacture, which is usually the first two digits of the serial number:

http://www.washburn.com/about/

[EDIT: here's a direct link to the 1999 models...your D46SCE is in the "Dread, Acoustic/Electric"  section.]

http://www.washburn.com/about/archives/1999.pdf

Stay tuned...others will probably be along soon to answer your questions regarding cleaning and oiling.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

tomana:
thank you, and for those links too, they are helpful for sure

I came across a write-up here at the forum http://forums.washburn.com/index.php?topic=20400.0
and they listed the following. The body back and sides also came in quilted rather than rosewood
but I do not know if this is year specific or not.

Top : One piece Alaskan spruce
Body - sides - head stock veneer : Madagascar rosewood
Neck : 5 piece ( last piece to be counted on it is the rosewood head stock ) mahogany
Bridge: Madagascar rosewood
Fretboard: Madagascar rosewood

Read a review for a 2000 model, said the back and sides are laminate. The official specs do not specify.
The one I bought is 1999 and may differ so I still need detailed specs

YerDugliness:

--- Quote from: tomana on August 06, 2012, 06:32:17 AM ---thank you, and for those links too, they are helpful for sure

Read a review for a 2000 model, said the back and sides are laminate. The official specs do not specify.
The one I bought is 1999 and may differ so I still need detailed specs

--- End quote ---

The back and sides on yours are laminate...Washburn uses a designation pattern on the model designation for their guitars that gives that information.  Here is what yours is:

D=dreadnought body style
46=model designation
S=solid wood soundboard (top)
CE=cutaway body style, electric pickup

If your guitar had sold wood sides and back, the "S" in the model designation would be "SW", instead.  Believe me, all solid wood construction is a BIG deal and Washburn is not going to let it go un-noticed, so that practice is, with at least one exception, consistent.  The exception (and there may be more) is the D10S model made with laminate walnut sides and back...Washburn does at times use letters to designate tonewood selection, so a D10S with walnut sides and back would carry a D10SW designation...a bit deceptive, IMHO.  Other tonewood designations don't always use the first letter of the name of the wood...quilted bubinga carries a "Q" in the model designation.  Sometimes the letters indicacte color, too..."B" might seem to be an indication of bubinga, but most often it is simply a designation that the guitar is black.  There is also an all laminate D46 model that is made of spalted maple, that model is D46SP...does not carry a solid wood top as you would suspect, the "SP" stands for "Spalted" in that case.  Ya gotta know the code and sometimes it is confusing, I admit.

For example, I had a WD32S and still have a WD32SW...the first had laminate sides and back, the second has solid wood sides and back.  If you will look through the soundhole and check out the sides, a guitar with solid wood sides will have braces along the insides of the sides going from the back to the top, a guitar with laminate sides and back will not.

Don't be fooled by matching grain inside the body and outside the body, the manufacturers of the laminate materials are very good at matching grains...veneers are cut very thin, so getting matching grain patterns is not a problem, and both sides of the laminate are veneers.

Don't worry about the sides and back being laminate...while it may be true that an all solid wood guitar might open up as it ages better than one with laminate sides and backs, the vast majority of the tonal improvement as the wood ages comes from the soundboard and yours does have a solid wood soundboard.  All solid wood guitars carry a requirement for increased care, as the wood has to be kept humidified or you run the risk of cracks....while most of my guits are all solid wood, I have now started buying models with  laminate sides and backs again, as I don't want to run the risk of developing cracks as I transport the all solid wood models around. The laminate models now travel with me, instead.

You'll love your Washie...one bit of advice, once you recieve it, take it to a shop or luthier and have a "set-up" done on it.  That will ensure that the neck is straight and that the relief and string height are at the optimum level.  It will run between $30 and $50, well worth it...while you are at it, have the luthier replace the plastic saddle with a bone one, you will be amazed at the difference in sound.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

 

t.y.:
Y.D. if I ever see a D46SP at a store, I am bying it, unless it has a crazy price tag. I love the look of that grain patteren.  Tom.   :)

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