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Author Topic: A rare Washburn model?  (Read 8481 times)

Offline Tony Raven

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Re: A rare Washburn model?
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2015, 02:45:09 PM »
Yeah, it does sound like a partial refret is in order.

But -- in my experience, that is to say -- replacing a few frets is MUCH more difficult for the beginner than replacing ALL the frets.

First, of course, you'd have to pull out the bad frets, without severely damaging the fingerboard wood. It's an ability that you probably don't want to learn on a guitar you treasure!!

If you were to replace ALL of the frets, then it's a (relatively) simple task to file them all to the same height, before you dress (round off) & polish them. But if you replace just a few frets, then you either need to use lower-profile fret wire, or extensively file down the new frets to match the height of the old ones.

And you should probably dress those old frets, especially those beginning to show moderate wear.

I can do it in a pinch, but the standard rate up here from various established shops is $10/fret, & I pay with a smile!!

More than you ever wanted to know about fret sizes --
http://www.lutherie.net/fret.chart.html
http://www.seymourduncan.com/blog/the-tone-garage/fret-sizes-and-materials/
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resident troublemaker: http://cheapguitars.boards.net/

Offline Heaton Craig

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Re: A rare Washburn model?
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2015, 07:14:16 AM »
Thanks very much for your swift and helpful response, Tony!  I am used to working with delicate woods and using a Dremel with various attachments.  I have been constructing radio controlled model aircraft for many years, so am used to working to fine tolerances with accuracy.  I read in the forums about re-fretting, that some manufacturers slid the fret wires, sideways, into the slots in the neck and some knocked them in, vertically down, with a small nylon hammer.  I don't suppose that by now anybody will know which method was used on the EA40 series Washburn 'Woodstock' model.  It would also really help to know if the factory used glue, or not.  As you rightly say, I certainly don't want to irreparably damage my guitar!  I think the previous owner only played the first three frets, as there appears to be nil wear, or damage to any frets further down the fingerboard.

Offline evenkeel

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Re: A rare Washburn model?
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2015, 09:55:43 AM »
You will most likely press or hammer the frets into place.  Also, be advised the EA40 has a bound neck.  Refreting frets on a bound, vs unbound neck, is much more difficult.  Finally, you should not glue the frets into place.  The tangs on the fret wire will hold them into position.

Good luck.

 

Offline YerDugliness

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I'd follow Evenkeel's advice if it were me.
« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2015, 06:23:17 PM »
I think the previous owner only played the first three frets, as there appears to be nil wear, or damage to any frets further down the fingerboard.

Those are what we call the "Cowboy chords".....one of our members, can't remember his name, had a tag line that read something like "There's no money to be made beyond the 5th fret, but it sure is a fun place to hang out!"

I, myself, am guilty of playing mostly within the first 5 frets...but thankfully I have enough guitars that none of them are showing wear like you see on yours.

If it were me (and I have a LOT of woodworking experience, much of it requiring very precise measurements) I'd follow Evenkeel's advice...a refret job on a bound fretboard would have to require very close tolerances! This is the stuff that pays for the college educations of most luthiers' children...it's their "bread and butter" work, so they'll get it right. No personal disrespect meant here....but huge respect for the very specialized skills that luthiers have!

Cheers!

Dugly 8)
« Last Edit: February 23, 2015, 06:25:41 PM by YerDugliness »
YerDugliness,Esq./Post No Bills
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Offline Heaton Craig

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Re: A rare Washburn model?
« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2015, 02:29:37 AM »
Hi Tony - thanks to both you, 'evenkeel' and 'Dugly'.  Having carefully examined my Washburn 'Woodstock', I can see no edge binding on the neck fingerboard.  If this is the case, re-fretting should be much less of a challenge, shouldn't it?  There are inlaid side dots, but these are inlaid on the rosewood surface lamination of the fretboard and wouldn't be affected by re-fretting.  Having checked, with a straight edge, for any bow in the neck, it's quite a relief to see there is none!