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Author Topic: razor sharp fret ends  (Read 1391 times)

jonyrotten

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razor sharp fret ends
« on: January 29, 2018, 04:11:43 PM »
question.  i'm in a position where i have razor edges on the bottom of my frets on a certain new guitar.  i'm not about to send this back to the factory, as those are the guys that let it get out of the factory to start with.  i have a rule that you never let the guys that screwed something up have a 2nd shot at it.  so the bottom edge of my frets, at 1st string high E, are sharp as all get out.  how would someone that has never had to do this before go about polishing these smooth? 

Offline Tony Raven

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Offline Dummy001

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Re: razor sharp fret ends
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2018, 07:39:52 AM »
The guitar might just be dry. The guitar is built in the Far East, then shipped to other locations for purchase. The climate changes tend to effect the wood, making changes. Purchase a quality hydrometer for guitars, and follow the directions. After the guitar has been rehydrated, the fret ends will seem to disappear. Hope this helps.

jonyrotten

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Re: razor sharp fret ends
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2018, 01:24:02 PM »
Two decent articles:

thank you much

The guitar might just be dry. The guitar is built in the Far East, then shipped to other locations for purchase. The climate changes tend to effect the wood, making changes. Purchase a quality hydrometer for guitars, and follow the directions. After the guitar has been rehydrated, the fret ends will seem to disappear. Hope this helps.

i was told that by the factory, but it's been here since early november, that should be time to acclimate to temp/humidity i think?  i mean, these aren't just a couple thousandths proud, they are way out there.  and it's not a Washy by the way.

Offline Tony Raven

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Re: razor sharp fret ends
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2018, 04:34:05 PM »
After the guitar has been rehydrated, the fret ends will seem to disappear.
Excellent advice, really.  :) But it's a short-term "fix"; when the guitar sits out of its humidified case for a while, the sharp edges reappear. If the ends are trimmed & dressed, it's probably done forever.

I think one of the articles suggests it's best to do this when the guitar is well dehydrated. In my region, that would be about the end of February. ;D

If it's a porous fretboard (rosewood, ebony, etc.), after trimming the ends the wood can be treated with lemon oil (available from most gear sites). Makes the wood look great, reduces chances of damage, & makes cleaning easy.
M1SDL; XB-400 (natural), XB-400 (burg), XB-500 (teal); X-10, X-33; D46CESP, WCSD30SCE; BT-3, BT-4, BT-6, JB-80; WS-4; WI-66V; Lyon LCT24; OS Autoharps

resident troublemaker: http://cheapguitars.boards.net/

jonyrotten

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Re: razor sharp fret ends
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2018, 02:39:37 PM »
Quote
If it's a porous fretboard (rosewood, ebony, etc.), after trimming the ends the wood can be treated with lemon oil (available from most gear sites). Makes the wood look great, reduces chances of damage, & makes cleaning easy.

maple, i love maple fretboards.  i've got some of everything, but i love to play the white board

Offline Tony Raven

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Re: razor sharp fret ends
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2018, 11:33:48 PM »
I've picked up a couple of maple-board guitars in recent years, not least the SD30 acoustic. Aside from that, the notable is a cheap Starcaster with some nice tigerstripe in the neck. I tend to favor maple that doesn't have a noticeable layer of clearcoat, & preferably unfinished (actually, I figure there's some sort of grain filler involved).

Fretwork can be done on any wood, of course, but the little nicks that sometimes happen are MUCH easier to repair (hide :o) with a dark & somewhat "fuzzy" wood like rosewood. When using a file near maple, it's best to simply slow down, be patient, do the work one or two ends at a time.
M1SDL; XB-400 (natural), XB-400 (burg), XB-500 (teal); X-10, X-33; D46CESP, WCSD30SCE; BT-3, BT-4, BT-6, JB-80; WS-4; WI-66V; Lyon LCT24; OS Autoharps

resident troublemaker: http://cheapguitars.boards.net/