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Author Topic: Vintage Washburn Identify Please  (Read 1184 times)

Offline Oldgunhunter

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Vintage Washburn Identify Please
« on: April 12, 2018, 04:17:47 PM »
I have a vintage marked Washburn guitar with a rather different head and neck.  The inlays appear to be of Washburn style but the head is not the cut-out style. 
I've posted these on my server and here are the links to the photos.
If you can help me, thanks in advance. 
The old guitar has been worked over and needs some serious restoration again.
http://www.west-orchards.com/washburn/washburn.jpg
http://www.west-orchards.com/washburn/washburn1.jpg
http://www.west-orchards.com/washburn/washburn2.jpg
http://www.west-orchards.com/washburn/washburn3.jpg

You may need to copy and paste these into your browser.  D.W.

ship of fools

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Re: Vintage Washburn Identify Please
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2018, 05:39:58 PM »
Howdy I myself am very unsure that it is a Washburn made guitar that label looks like nothing in any of my catalogues nor does it looks right with what looks like maybe had the whole top by the neck cut out and replaced with some other piece, I have sent a message to the one person who knows a lot more about these older models but I am sure he maybe confused by the label inside and with no center spline I am thinking someone may have made the label and stuck it in to represent Washburn.
Can you tell us what else the label says and those numbers make no sense.Looks as if someone deliberately removed a name on the head of the neck.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 05:46:20 PM by ship of fools »

Offline Oldgunhunter

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Re: Vintage Washburn Identify Please
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2018, 07:50:40 AM »
I thought also might be the case with this old guitar but the inlays are similar on the neck to some early Washburns.  The label says  George Washburn (around the outer area top and bottom)  New Scale , and the number  12182414  , it looks indicative to the guitar to me.  I'm not sure about the head and if there was a label on it or not.  It could have been a price sticker on it there too.  It was purchase at an estate tag sale.
Thanks for any help.

Offline keef

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Re: Vintage Washburn Identify Please
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2018, 02:02:35 PM »
What it is I don't know, but that is most certainly not a Washburn or Lyon & Healy made guitar of any era, and neither a prototype for these. Possibly faked label, serial number not conforming at all to the pre WW 2 era.
 

ship of fools

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Re: Vintage Washburn Identify Please
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2018, 03:58:55 PM »
well thats what I thought keef is the most knowledgeable person in the world when it comes to pre war Washburns he actually wrote a book on the subject so its like I thought its not a real Washburn and looking back I do remember seeing a label like that once before on a pieced together old parlor some one was trying to sell on Ebay

Offline Oldgunhunter

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Re: Vintage Washburn Identify Please
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2018, 06:48:54 AM »
Thanks so much for the input.  Not sure now what I'll do with the old wall hanger.  Maybe dismantle and sell the cool old neck on eBay.

Offline Tony Raven

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Re: Vintage Washburn Identify Please
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2018, 12:44:06 PM »
Aside from fancy "presentation" models, very few L&H instruments have major value. At their peak, L&H cranked them out by the cartload, literally.

Being "commodity" instruments, most were used to death then parked in the basement or attic, with no maintenance at all. In my experience, good acoustic guitars eventually NEED to have their necks reset, & sometimes other work (pull up & reglue the bridge, reattach the braces, etc.).

The early "parlor-size" guitars were originally intended for gut strings; because of their short scale, they adapted moderately well to steel strings without collapsing the top or ripping the heel loose -- initially, at least.

And the adjustable trussrod hadn't been invented yet. Very few guitars had any sort of neck reinforcement at all. People who restore/upgrade larger guitars might add a trussrod & maybe rearrange the braces.

An acquaintance told me he'd paid $200 for a beat-up but playable L&H, planned on putting $500 or so into restoring it, & asked what it'd be worth. I said he'd have a pretty good $700 guitar. ??? Fixing a guitar is like building a hotrod: do it for the experience & to have a fun toy, because if you ever try to sell it you'll be lucky to recoup even the parts cost. Fixing a guitar for one's own use minimizes downside, & the value will likely remain stable for eventual trade/resale.

I wouldn't eBay the neck separately. So long as you don't misrepresent what you've got, there's probably someone who'll pay more for shipping to get a vintage"project" guitar.
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