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Author Topic: im having trouble  (Read 5526 times)

Offline wiggles2wiggles

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im having trouble
« on: July 10, 2006, 05:18:21 PM »
im having a hard time being flouent with my chords. i can transition at all while i strum. any excersizes that would help?
 

Offline FlyMolo

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im having trouble
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2006, 03:22:44 PM »
It's all about practice. I had the same trouble, and I'm sure most people did, when I began. One thing I did to help out was not to strum, and just practice change chords in time with the music, or just using a metronome. Even practicing without the timing of the music at first is helpful. Once your fretting hand has the movement and timing in muscle memory, then add back in your strumming to go along with it. I usually practiced about 3-5 minutes just changing chords with my left hand, and I still do that when I'm learning new songs that have chords or progressions that I'm not used to playing.

Keep at it, and you'll get there.

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Offline Styles

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im having trouble
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2006, 11:02:18 AM »
One thing is for sure if you are having trouble... SLOW it down... play as slow as you have to so the changes are smooth.

This feels and sounds wierd at first but will work better and faster than anything else...

Remember practicing properly is more important than speed..

Rock on...[8D]
 

Offline jlloydnlv

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im having trouble
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2007, 01:29:23 PM »
Styles has it !  
When I was in the high-school band, our director would walk us through new music or difficult passages at a very slow speed. Once the changes are in your memory by rote, you will find your mechanical ability and accuracy improving with the amount of practice time you devote.
One thing to look at : watch other players' hand movements as they play, and compare them to your own. Sometimes, your 'finners kinda bump into each other. By studying as many other players' techniques as you can, you should be able to find different ones to try, and find what's best suited for you.
Remember: Practice ! Practice ! Practice !  
Caution!- Don't over-do it !  It's easy to get frustrated and keep pounding at yourself to get it right.  This is Ba-a-a-d!  When you find that happening, set your instrument down and walk away.  Do something else, wait til next day, whatever.  After you've cleared your mind, try it again.
You may be surprised at the results !
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Offline Gitfiddle

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im having trouble
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2009, 06:46:22 PM »
There are threshholds in playing a guitar.  One is just grabbing chords and have a nice clear tone on all the strings (that takes a while -- weeks anyway)  and then learning a library of chords (depending on what you want to play).  As for changing quickly (once you are getting pretty good ... make your left hand keep up with the right hand (don't give it a break) ..make it move to the next chord on time (in count).  You will get in the habit.  Also do not grab chords with a death grib .. light .. just enough to get a clean chord.  Count 1&2&3&4&  .. keep the count going .. and make your hand keep up with the count.

One more thing .. we tend to learn to grab a chord with our index finger first THEN our middle finger THEN our ring finger THEN our pinky ... but reverse that since the pick lands on the pinky string FIRST and then the Ring and Middl and Index .. down E-A-D-G-B-E .. so learn to grab them all at once or pinky first.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2009, 06:49:19 PM by Gitfiddle »
 

Offline Texas Flatpicker

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im having trouble
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2010, 03:47:48 PM »
Muscle memory and practice, practice, practice...these other guys have not steered you wrong that have repsonded.
 

Offline YerDugliness

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im having trouble
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2010, 07:32:51 PM »
Having been self-taught by a teacher who didn't know the first thing about music, I can offer one hint that I have found helpful....find out which chords go in which key, and the key in which the song is written, then you'll seldom be playing a chord that is wrong.  Additionally, find a chord dictionary that will show you a multitude of ways to make each chord and practice alternate finger locations (for example, I seldom use my index finger when making an E chord), for good reason....to be explained later.

quote:
Originally posted by Gitfiddle

One more thing .. we tend to learn to grab a chord with our index finger first THEN our middle finger THEN our ring finger THEN our pinky ... but reverse that since the pick lands on the pinky string FIRST and then the Ring and Middl and Index .. down E-A-D-G-B-E .. so learn to grab them all at once or pinky first.



Here's another reason to change up the fingers with which you make your chords.....once you have learned all the first position chords, and have become fluent with the changes within a key, you would then be wise to learn to make the same chords with the middle, ring and pinky fingers rather than the index, middle and ring fingers.  Why?  Well, an intermediate player will learn that some simple chords can be used to make some rather difficult chords if you just lay your index finger across the fretboard (make a bar with it) and then make a standard chord at a different location on the neck (for example, a simple two finger Em chord becomes a very difficult Gm chord if it is barred at the 3rd fret)....this is called barre chording and it opens up a whole different part of the neck!

Practice, practice, and just when you think you'll puke if you practice any more, do it anyway.  The earlier you can get those muscle patterns into your memory, the more quickly the chord changes will become automatic, rather than strained.

Cheers!

Dugly [8D]

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