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Author Topic: Washburn beginner  (Read 3327 times)

Offline Merlin

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Washburn beginner
« on: January 11, 2007, 05:24:27 PM »
I bought a used Washburn from a guy I know about 4 months ago.  I originally bought it just to have a guitar to learn on.  I love playing and I have already started to think about my next guitar.  Could some of you experienced players tell me what my Washburn or Washburn’s in general have to offer over other guitars?  

Thanks
 

Offline Merlin

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« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2007, 07:33:26 PM »
Oh, I am not a troll.  Sorry, if I gave you that impression.
I have a D-11N serial #96080113.  It has been a great beginners guitar.  

I asked the question because I like my guitar and was thinking of staying with the Washburn brand.  I play mostly country and have always heard of Martin and Gibson guitars and I was not sure if there was a difference in the brands I was missing.

I am a true beginner, but I am trying to learn.
 

Offline Dreadman

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« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2007, 07:59:05 PM »
If Washburn has a leg up on the competition it's gotta be in the price. You can get guitars that are better but you'll jump up in price to get there. Your best bet would be to play as many different guitars as you can before making a decision because while some people love Washburns more than anything, there are others feel the same way about every other brand.

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Offline Dreadman

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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2007, 08:01:03 PM »
Another thing - The D-11 is a real nice looking guitar and sounds pretty good but any solid top acoustic will blow it away soundwise and any all-solid wood guitar will beat that, generally speaking.

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Offline Merlin

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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2007, 08:18:22 PM »
Dreadman, your right about the price.  Everyone I play with loves the sound of my guitar and I was shocked at how cheap it listed for.  I guess that is another reason I am asking the question about washburns.  I feel like I can upgrade my washburn with a better washburn without going broke.

I was also wondering if it was me or does country and bluegrass artist  generally do not use washburns or do they?  I don't know for sure, thats way I am asking.
 

Offline just strum

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« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2007, 08:21:30 PM »
What price range are you looking at?

If you are looking to buy new, go to RGGmusic.com our resident dealer.

Mark

http://www.washburn.com/forum/pop_profile.asp?mode=display&id=6645


« Last Edit: January 11, 2007, 08:22:01 PM by just strum »
 

Offline Merlin

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« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2007, 09:17:45 PM »
I am not ready to buy yet.  
I just want to be able to speak intelligently about my Washburn when people ask.
 

Offline bignate

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« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2007, 10:14:15 PM »
If you check the washburn website you can find a list of artist that use Washburn guitars I know Joe Don Rooney from Rascal Flatts plays the Timbercraft series.  I have one in the ac/ec cutway version and I could not be happier with a guitar purchase.

Here is the link http://www.washburn.com/artists/index.aspx

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Offline Lunaray

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« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2007, 10:32:46 PM »
If you live in or close to a big town, hit as many music stores as you can and try as many guitars as you can and don't be intimidated by price tags, find out the difference between different models by playing them.  Most music stores are staffed by musicians and they understand what it takes to find the right instrument.  I kind of think that a guitar is like a soul mate, when you find your instrument, you'll know it!  The first time I saw my Ovation 1983 colector's series, I was infatuated with her appearance, but when I picked her up and played her, I knew she was the one for me, and there were several others hanging on the wall for hundreds of dollars more, and I could've afforded any one of them at the time, but none of them compared to my Ovation!  It's a very subjective thing!

Good luck Merlin,
Ray
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Offline mike_from_AK

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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2007, 10:39:40 PM »
Just my two cents and feel free to crucify me if you must.....

Truthfully, I think the best guitar you're going to get as far as bang for the buck is a Carvin.  They have a line of Acoustic Electrics called Cobalts.  You go to some of these places and play guitars like the upper end Martins and Taylors and you're talking between $1500 and $3000, perhaps higher.  That's just at a Guitar Center.  However, these cobalts feel and sound just as nice and they're (with hardshell case) between $650 and $750.

I know I'm talking to a bunch of Washburn fans here and they may disagree with me.  That's their right to do so.  Personally, I too like Washburn and am considering getting me one of their acoustic electrics for the pure fact I don't have over $500 to spend.  I know they make a good product.  My wife's uncle swears by them.  So I'm not here just to bash Washburn, it might be the right fit for you.  Only you can decide.  The other thing is, and this is more so with electrics than acoustics but still important; the neck: the way your hand wraps around it; the feeling you get gripping it is imperative to the purchase of any guitar.  Although, I'm sure you know this.

All the best,
Mike
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Offline mike_from_AK

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« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2007, 10:55:21 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by Lunaray

If you live in or close to a big town, hit as many music stores as you can and try as many guitars as you can and don't be intimidated by price tags, find out the difference between different models by playing them.  Most music stores are staffed by musicians and they understand what it takes to find the right instrument.  I kind of think that a guitar is like a soul mate, when you find your instrument, you'll know it!  The first time I saw my Ovation 1983 colector's series, I was infatuated with her appearance, but when I picked her up and played her, I knew she was the one for me, and there were several others hanging on the wall for hundreds of dollars more, and I could've afforded any one of them at the time, but none of them compared to my Ovation!  It's a very subjective thing!

Good luck Merlin,
Ray



Ray,

I wanted to relate a similar story.  I was in Southern California at the time and I was shopping for a 5 string bass.  I looked at all kinds of basses; from Washburn to Jackson to you name it.  I couldn't find anything.  Then I decided to leave the store on the opposite side of the isle I walked past coming in.  And there sat before me a Jade green Ibanez Soundgear SR885 (I think top of the line that year).  Oddly enough, my wife and I were just looking at a Soundgear catalogue the weekend before and I mentioned I could never afford one of those, but I wanted one in jade green with 5 strings.  This one retailed at $995.

Apparently, the bass sat on the shelf for six or more months so they wanted to clearance it out bad.  They sold it to me for $400.  Everytime I take it in for a service the luthier's always say, I've never seen a Soundgear in this kind of shape or quality.  I drove up the AlCan Highway (Alaska / Canadian Highway) at the end of December a couple of years ago.  At several points, but one point in particular, we were in -45 degree weather.  I didn't have room for my musical instruments in the car since my family had to go there, so it went in the non-insulated trailer we were pulling.  When we got into Anchorage and I got it in the house and let it warm up a bit, I pulled it out and she wasn't even out of tune.  I took her in for a service and again, it needed slight adjustments, comparitivaly to your typical 6 month servicing.

So I know what you mean about finding that one instrument that is meant to be yours.  It still looks brand new and I bought it in '98 I believe.

Sorry to talk about my bass in the acoustic forum!
Mike
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Offline exvol

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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2007, 11:08:34 PM »
I play Washburns D-10 and J28, both acoustic electrics, because I am not a professional musician and I don't need an overpriced guitar.  Martins and the other higher priced guitars may well be worth the money, but I just can't justify spending much over $500 for a guitar.  When I was shopping for my first new guitar (I already played, but they were hand-me-downs), I played every guitar from $79 on up.  My budget was $500 and I bought my D10SCE at $269.  It was honestly the best playing guitar in the store.  The neck makes it very easy to play.
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Offline dlovegrove

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« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2007, 05:32:38 AM »
I'm in a similar situation - I've been playing about the same length of time, and just moved from my cheap all-laminate Washburn to a better all-solid wood model. I came into this with no attachment to any manufacturer - for that matter, one year ago I probably couldn't have named a manufacturer.

I'll summarize the landscape from a newbie point of view... the (American) guitar world is very loosely divided into guitars imported from Asian manufacturers (Washburn, Takamine, Ibanez, etc); guitars mass-produced in the U.S. (Martin, Taylor); and handbuilt guitars. The  American factory-builts tend toward better quality control while the imports tend toward better bang-for-buck. Handbuilt guitars have to be analyzed individually, but will generally be better than either of the other categories.

You specifically asked what Washburn has to offer over other guitars. I'll break that apart into those broad categories.

For importers, the big battle is controlling build quality. Washburn has generally been able to do this as well or better than other importers, particularly in certain products. For instance, they have really nailed it with the D10S, which is probably the best entry-level guitar on the market and is getting widespread recognition as such. If you go to a dealer and play a $500 Washburn, then play a $500 model from the other importers, odds are you will favor the Washburn. As long as you compare similar models, Washburn produces a consistently better guitar for the price.

Against the American factory-built guitars, Washburn has two distinct advantages. On the low end to mid-range models, they produce generally equivalent guitars at a much lower price. In addition, you will generally get more glitz per $ - more inlay, etc. On the high end, they stop the importing and build the guitars in the US. Those can easily hold their own against anything out there, but again are available at a lower price. The USA Acoustics are also Washburn's primary answer to the handbuilt market, hand signed by the luthier who made it.

I found that Washburn consistently offered a better finish than equivalently priced models from other companies. Just my opinion.

I also found that Washburn seemed to offer better quality components for the price - Grover tuners, etc.

One benefit of Washburn is Dreadman. Hang around these forums for a while and you'll see what I mean.

Two good/bad mixed items: many models of lower-end Washburns are heavier - made from thicker wood. That quiets the sound slightly, but it also makes the guitar more durable and less prone to cracks/splits. Also, Washburn has a thriving seconds market, which can provide you a decent guitar at a spectacularly low price (but with a down side - peruse the forums for details).

Down sides to Washburn?
 - Like the other imports, quality control isn't perfect, so play the guitar first or buy from a dealer like RGG music that will make sure you don't get a lemon.
 - Like the other imports, many of the low-end models don't come set up correctly. Again, a good dealer is invaluable.
 - They come with junk strings installed. Replace the strings and you will get a huge improvement in sound.
 - Finally, like the other imports, their cheaper models come with plastic nuts and saddles that should be replaced for best sound.
David




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« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2007, 07:43:06 AM »
Mike_From_AK,not at all we are just a bunch of guys and girls who happen to really enjoy our Washburns,Carvins do make nice guitars and I have had the oppertunity to play several models for a friend who owns a music store.
I do think Merlin should look at a D10 next at least its a solid top and can make his next move to a solid wood guitar after that,so welcome Merlin and ask as there is no such thing as a stupid question,however you may find sme perfectly dumb answers from me and a few others,so play away.louis

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Offline Merlin

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« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2007, 08:27:06 AM »
Thanks, this is the information I was looking for.
I have spent the last few months learning how to play and now I have turned my focus toward learning about my equipment.

Again, I will say that I have played with a lot of people with high end other brand guitars and they are amazed at the sound of my washburn.  

 I live in Nashville and I don't see very many acoustic washburns in the store nor do I see very many country and bluegrass artist playing them.  I guess that is why I wanted to learn more about my washburn and the washburn brand.

Thanks, everybody

p.s. good post David, good reading
« Last Edit: January 12, 2007, 11:50:01 AM by Merlin »