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Messages - YerDugliness

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1
General Discussion / Re: WG26 variations
« on: November 17, 2017, 10:24:51 AM »
The second WG26S has arrived and I notice a few differences between the two I own. First of all, one serial number starts with "CC", followed by the serial number, whereas the newer one has just one "C" followed by the serial number.  This leads me to believe that perhaps the two guitars were made in different factories. "CC" would (if my memory is correct) be Cort, China...but both paper stickers inside the guitar are clearly marked "Made in China" at the very bottom, so I guess it might be possible that both were made in Cort, with the expectation that the second "C" might be redundant since the paper label is so clear about the guitar having been "Made in China"? Other differences between the stickers relate to the model number designation (The "CC" version says "WG26S" followed by "Natural" whereas the "C" version simply says "WG26S".)

There are other differences in construction, minor as they may be. For example, the maple binding around the body at the soundboard is "wider" on the "CC" model than it is on the "C" model...but both are exactly the same model, so how is that happening unless they are made in different factories?

This newer "C" model seems to be much louder than the "CC" model. Both have exemplary consistency across the strings. This model is the best I have ever heard regarding what I think is a very common "muting" of the G-string...it is quite obvious on some of my Washburns and quite notably absent on both of the WG26S guitars...but the "C" model just seems to enjoy about a 3dB advantage in volume for some reason.

One thing I think is a bit unusual...the braces under the soundboard, which are tapered, are rather poorly "shaved"...it looks like somebody did the tapering with a kitchen knife. Most of my Washburns have much more "professional" looking work in that area...like it was shaved by a machine. It probably has nothing to do with the splendid sound of this model, it was just something I noticed as I was looking at the guitar.

Already one of my friends wants to buy one of my WG26S guits...I may well sell him one and use the $$$ to buy a 3rd one...it might be a nice opportunity to choose the best two, or the two that match the best in appearance.

This Washburn sounds as good as my Epiphone AJ500RC Masterbilt, which I just had "juiced" and will get back (hopefully) this coming Friday.

Cheers! I'll come back again and update this thread as I get more acquainted with these fine instruments.

Dugly 8)

2
I notice more and more that when I am trying to post a response to a thread the forum software refuses to post it and I get a banner notice something to the effect of "We are unable to post your response. Try again and if it continues to fail contact an administrator".

It's sporadic, but prevalent enough that it tends to be a bit of a problem, particularly if the response was lengthy...the forum just deletes the draft response in quick order if it won't post it.

Has anyone else had this issue? It usually happens to me if I'm trying to post during the evening, if that has anything to do with it...but it could have nothing to do with it, too.

...or...it could be related to using an iPhone to post replies (my desktop at home is on the fritz!).

I'm sure hoping this can be fixed!

Cheers!

Dugly 8)


3
Contact Bob Colosi at www.guitarsaddles.com

Bob is the one who usually answers the phone...he's a hands-on sort of guy!

He offers bone saddles, nuts, strap buttons, bridge pins and end pins...but can also craft those items from other materials, such as fossilized walrus tusk and (my favorite) West African Hard Ivory.

While it might be easy to think Bob could just make one from scratch, he'll likely need to have your current nut in hand, so I'd recommend sending him your current plastic nut to "replicate". I say "replicate" because he'll always provide the new bone "blank" slightly oversize (this allows a tech or luthier to custom fit it to the neck) so it will need to be shaved to size and have string slots appropriate for the string gauges you use added.  The regular routine is that the customer takes the guitar to a shop tech or a luthier for those services.

His prices are reasonable.  Good luck!

Cheers!

Dugly 8)


4
General Discussion / Re: WG26 variations
« on: November 10, 2017, 03:26:29 PM »
Yeah...I liked my WG26S so much I ordered a second one today.

I'll get my Epiphone Masterbilt back over Thanksgiving vacation and will then be able to compare the sound of the two. I thought my AJ500RC sounded good, but this WG26S may give it a real run for its money!

Cheers!

Doug

5
Ryan, that model number is pretty close to the models that were made in the acoustic guitar custom shop some time ago when John Stover was running that operation...perhaps not the D52SW (this failing memory is telling me that the D64SW and later models were the custom shop models), but that D52SW model is a fairly highly regarded standard Washburn piece. There will be a thread on the Acoustic guitar forum authored by "Don't Tread on Me" in which the member purchased a D52SW from Pike, one of our former contributors here on the forum (I think it might have been the "CE" model, too).

Your D52SW will be an all solid-wood guitar, so if you're not ready to baby it somewhat it might not be the best choice for you. As with all all solid-wood guitars, it'll require periodic humidification and the same sort of extra care we all lavish on our all solid-wood guitars. I sincerely doubt that it will be more robust than your D48 Comanche...

Keep us posted on what you find out...and don't be afraid to use the "Search" function at the top of the forum, you'll probably find a lot of info there about the D52SW stuff!

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

6
I found a flint hill d52sw for pretty cheap online but I can't tell where it was made,

Can you post the serial number off the paper tag inside the body of the guitar?

Quite often those serial numbers start with two letters, which tell the place of manufacture (for example, CC is "Cort, China" and SI is "Samick, Indonesia". Tony Raven has posted in the General Discussion forum a thread regarding what you can and what you cannot tell from the serial numbers.  Here is a link to that thread:

http://forums.washburn.com/index.php/topic,26561.0.html

As I read the above linked thread, I realize it says that identifying the place of manufacture is a crap shoot because there is no telling what the abbreviations for the place of manufacture match...but IIRC there is a Wiki page somewhere that lists some of the abbreviations, so try searching Wikipedia, too.

Let us know about the serial number if you can!

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

7
General Discussion / Re: used Washburns on the market
« on: October 17, 2017, 02:17:00 PM »
Most of the folk guitars I have played had not only wider necks than most steel string guitars, but they also did not have a radiused fretboard, like most steel string guitars have. The fretboard was flat like a classical guitar (that's important when choosing a capo).

(Edit: it's been a while, but other differences were the folk guitar had a peg-head rather than a slot-head, like a classical...finally, I can't remember, but it seems some folk models were 14 frets free and others were 12 frets free...but, logic tells me they were all 12-frets free.)

Bob Dylan played a folk guitar a lot at first.....as one would expect.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)


8
General Discussion / Some Washburn history presented by Washburn, itself!
« on: October 17, 2017, 02:12:31 PM »
We all hear about the long history Washburn has, but because of a factory fire long ago a lot of records were destroyed. This video contains dates and may go a short way toward getting historical references direct from Washburn.

http://www.washburn.com/media/video/99-The-History-of-Washburn-Guitars.html

Cheers!

Dugly 8)


9
Vintage and Rare Washburns / Re: Help identifying
« on: October 11, 2017, 10:33:08 AM »
Hey everybody, asking for a lil. Someone told me they believed this to be a Washburn by looking at the bridge. There is not a single mark or number anywhere that I can find. Thanks for any help!

Washburn did use a rather unique bridge for a while...sometimes referred to as a "butterfly bridge" or a "bat bridge".

Ship is right, we need photos. Photobucket use to be our go-to hosting site but they shut down their free service and their rate is too high for most of us, so try www dot postimage dot com. We need an "IMG" link to see the photos on the forum pages.

Try this...look inside the body of the guitar from the bottom so that you can see the block inside the body where the neck attaches to the body. There may be a serial number on there. It's not unusual for older Washburns to have lost their paper label inside the body of the guitar, so here's hoping you have a number on the neck block.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)


10
Vintage and Rare Washburns / Re: Washburn D61 SW
« on: October 10, 2017, 01:52:07 PM »
Hi, Joe...welcome to the forum!

I also own a D61SW, but mine has been dated at 1994. It is my best Washburn Dreadnought!

As for value, I wish I could help more but the only one I have "priced" is my current D61SW, and it was purchased with the knowledge that it had a cracked bridge...IIRC I paid $325 plus shipping.

Yours should certainly be worth more and these Yamaki built guitars enjoy a huge reputation here at Washburn. If I were selling mine I'd say $400 would be my drop-dead low price and I'd certainly try to hold out for more...

Once you determine an asking price you might want to advertise it for sale here on this forum...use the "Dealers" forum to advertise private sale items.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

11
Ryan, that model number is pretty close to the models that were made in the acoustic guitar custom shop some time ago when John Stover was running that operation...perhaps not the D52SW (this failing memory is telling me that the D64+sw's and up were the custom shop models), but that model is a fairly highly regarded standard Washburn piece. There will be a thread on the Acoustic guitar forum authored by "Don't Tread on Me" in which the member purchased a D52SW from Pike, one of our former contributors here on the forum (I think it might have been the "CE" model, too).

Your D52SW will be an all solid-wood guitar, so if you're not ready to baby it somewhat it might not be the best choice for you. As with all all solid-wood guitars, it'll require periodic humidification and the same sort of extra care we all lavish on our all solid-wood guitars. I sincerely doubt that it will be more robust than your D48 Comanche...

Keep us posted on what you find out...and don't be afraid to use the "Search" function at the top of the forum, you'll probably find a lot of info there about the D52SW stuff!

Cheers!

Dugly 8)


12
Have you done a forum search? I just did and got a LOT of hits on Yairi.

The search tab is on the grey function bar at top

...home...help...search...profile...

My search was for "Washburn Yairi"

There will be 100 times the orange "Washburn" hits than there will by orange "Yairi" hits, but there are quite a few. Try it, you'll like it!!

Cheers!!

Dugly 8)

13
If you've talked with Jim Smith, Sr. you've spoken with one of the most knowledgeable parties regarding Washburn history...perhaps Ship of Fools will chime in, as he is also very knowledgeable about Washburn's early production and history.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

14
WD40 is almost useless as a lubricant, as its most prevalent ingredient is alcohol...which is used to displace water in certain applications (hence the first two letters in the product name...WD, for "water displacer").

Here is what I would do...buy a small squirt can of "Lock Ease", obviously a product used to lubricate the tumbler mechanism in locks. That product contains graphite, which is a great long-term lubricant.

It might work...it might not, but it is not expensive so it is what I would try first.

Please let us know if it works.

Cheers, and good luck!!

Dughy 8)

15
Acoustic Guitar Players Post Comments & Questions / Re: Comort series
« on: October 03, 2017, 02:15:57 PM »
From Tony's information, it sounds like the 25 is the one I'd want.

It has great specs...AND you get the great Grover 18:1 tuners! No wonder it's so expensive!

Hope you can get one!

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

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