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Messages - YerDugliness

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1
Hi friends,

I'd like to post a couple of pictures, but I can't figure out how ??  ::)
Cheers, S

Take a look in the General Discussion board for a "pinned" topic authored by our member t.y.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

2
Show Us Your Washburn / Re: New (to me) Acoustic, what is it?
« on: March 20, 2017, 12:42:45 PM »
Photos would help...here is a link to a tutorial on how to post photos on the forum:

http://forums.washburn.com/index.php/topic,21807.0.html

Hope this helps...could not see anything on the link you posted.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

3
Announcements & News / Re: RIP Chuck Berry
« on: March 20, 2017, 10:40:14 AM »
Same here...a great loss. I've read up on how he "managed" his performances...GEEZ, he had to go through a lot! He didn't hire any sort of management that would take care of logistics, so every time he got into a new town he had to rent a venue, hire side-players, ad infinitum, just to play his music. 

He was a true musician...one who suffered through the difficulties almost all musicians face getting their music out there for the masses.

He must have been good at it...EVERYONE knew who Chuck Berry was and his songs were instantly recognizable.

He'll be showing them how to do it in the afterlife, too!

Cheers to a great, Americian musical icon, Chuck Berry's music will live on, even if he's not.

Dugly 8)

4
OK...what little I know:

Your guitar is a "dreadnought" size guitar...that is a fairly large guitar, but not as large as a Jumbo. When "orchestras" became a popular source of entertainment in the days before Les Paul "developed" the electric guitar, the smaller size guitars popular before orchestras became common were not loud enough to be heard, so a larger bodied guitar was developed so the guitar in the orchestra could be heard. Enter the "Dreadnought" size guitar.

Yours is a model that was heralded as perhaps the best value in acoustic guitars at the time it was made in 2007...the D10 series. There were D10 guitars, which were all laminate construction (not always a bad thing, depending on your intended use), but the real winner in the D10 lineup was the D10S model...replace the "select spruce" soundboard (Washburns terminology for a laminate soundboard) with a solid wood spruce soundboard and you have the D10S model, which yours is. I have played 6-string D10S guitars and they are a pleasure to play and sound great! Yours is, of course, the 12 string version...not many of those around.

At that time the factory was using plastic for the saddle and nut. If you want the guitar to sound better take it to a luthier or a GOOD shop tech and have them replace the nut and saddle with bone pieces. Over time, with playing, the solid wood soundboard will develop improved tone as part of the ageing process, that is why the D10S is so desirable. Your soundboard is solid spruce, the sides and back are most likely laminated "sapele", a variety of mahogany. The guitar will have a nice, "woody" tone!

 One thing you will find difficult is locating a hard-shell case to fit your guitar. The size of the long 12-string head causes it not to fit into most cases. If you have an OHSC with your guitar its value may equal or exceed the value of the guitar. A 6-string D10S may have been "street priced" in the low to mid $200 range...your 12-string would obviously have cost more.

IIRC the guitars with serial numbers starting with "G" were made somewhere in China.

Hope this has helped.

Dugly 8)

5
Announcements & News / Re: Chicago Custom Shop -- HELP ME
« on: March 08, 2017, 12:02:10 PM »
Tony, regarding your request for an email address for someone who could answer a few questions, your best bet for this kind of information would have been Ship of Fools...but if you read his recent farewell post you'll realize he has suffered a TIA and his memory may not be as accurate as it has been in the past.

Next to Ship, I'd say Evenkeel might be your best bet...you can probably find his email address on his forum profile...or PM him. He is still active, but not as much as he was in the past.

Other than that, a couple of long-departed members come to mind...but I am not too sure they would welcome any inquiries. One of them experienced some difficulty making a moderator happy, but the other just seemed to fade away. What a shame...he was VERY knowledgable! We seem to lose a lot of valuable members to "attrition", so to speak.

Sorry I couldn't be of more help  :(

Cheers to you for embarking on this endeavor, and good luck! I'll keep you in my prayers... ;D

Dugly 8)

6
Festival Series / Re: Additional Specs on EA series (EA20SNB)
« on: March 07, 2017, 07:28:10 PM »

Also, the Festivals are described as mini-jumbo. That means nothing to me.


Yeah, I have often wondered why Washburn refers to the Festivals as "Mini Jumbos" when they already have a series of guitars (no longer on the production list) that are called "Mini Jumbo", too...I own three, two of the WMJ21S model (Cedar over Rosewood) and one of the WMJ11S models (Spruce over mahogany). Both have the larger lower bout and the smaller upper bout, but neither has the small "waist" I associate with actual "Jumbo" models, nor do they have the depth that I associate with Jumbos.

There is, however, one model in my "collection" that really does resemble a smaller (mini) Jumbo model...my WGO26SWCE. I suppose the "GO" part stands for "Grand Auditorium", but in my hand this axe has the feel and the projection we'd expect from a true Jumbo that has been cut down in size. I love the guitar (except that I need to dress the first fret...the nut is cut so deep that the e string buzzes on the fret, but I can take care of that the next time I have the strings off for a change).

The Festival series is so shallow that it really does lack projection when played unplugged. They do, however, REALLY ROCK when played plugged in. Highly recommended if you play slide, too.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)


7
You will be sorely missed, Ship! For some time now you have been one of the few members who has a grasp on Washburn's historical workings, not to mention your knowledge regarding the older parlor guitars.

I wish you the best, buddy! Good luck (I had no idea you were experiencing multiple medical issues)!

Cheers to you, Ship!

Dugly 8)

8
That is the one I would have ordered if I needed another dread!

Please let us know how you like it once you have played it  ;D

Cheers from Dugly 8)

9
General Discussion / Re: Information on this please
« on: March 03, 2017, 08:50:28 AM »
If there is a photo attached, it does not build for me.

Most of us who post photos use a web-based photo hosting website, such as Photobucket. Once you upload photos to the site, just copy the IMG code and paste it into your post, the photo will be visible.

Cheers!!

Dugly 8)

10
World Music has a "New Product" special on a couple of Washburn all solid wood guitars:

WD250SWCE, regularly $749.99, now $429.99. This is a juiced guitar, ready for stage work. Probably a limited time offer, but not one of those " Stupid Deal of the Day" specials. This is advertised as having a solid wood spruce soundboard and solid Rosewood back and sides.

Also a WD150SWCE for $449.99, regular price $649.99. This one is advertised as having a solid wood spruce soundboard and solid wood mahogany back and sides. That one makes the WD250SWCE a VERY good deal!

Check to make sure World Music is an authorized dealer, though...that way you also get the warranty.

Git ya some of that!!!

Cheers!!

Dugly 8)

11
I have a WD32SW (all solid wood construction) that I would consider selling. It has been mod'ed with West African Hard Ivory nut and saddle, as well as bone strap button and bridge pins. The endpin is still plastic, though.

It is in "as new" condition...but as I purchased it from a forum member there is no factory warranty.

Washburn models with the "SW" designation in their model number will be of all solid-wood construction and there are "SW" models available new.

You mentioned "spalted maple"...the lone example that violates the "SW" rule is one if the spalted Maple models, so be aware of that one exception in making your choice.

They are breathtakingly beautiful, though, aren't they?

Please feel free to ask more questions...lots of knowledge on this forum!

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

12
Washburn Dealers Section / Re: WTB WD32S!
« on: February 22, 2017, 12:23:42 PM »
Still hoping to find a good, used WD32S...serious buyer  :D .

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

13
Southwest Series / Re: D42SCE Need any information at all!
« on: February 21, 2017, 08:46:27 PM »
The D42SCE is a dreadnought size (large, but not the largest size) guitar. It has a solid wood soundboard, which is a pretty big deal because the soundboard's tone will improve with age and playing. The sides and back are made of "laminated" layers of wood, which is not necessarily a bad thing. The "CE" part of the model number means that the body of the guitar has a "cutaway" so the player can reach the higher pitched notes at the end of the fretboard and the guitar is factory equipped with an electronic pickup so it can be played through an amplifier or a PA system.

Based on the serial number your guitar was made in Samick, China, probably in 2003.

With Washburns of this nature, the higher the number, the better the guitar. My first Washburn was a WD32S, a VERY nice guitar...I wish I still owned it, it would be a great road guitar...yours would be a better model than that one of mine.

Well, after spending some time with the search function, it appears that you have been in the right place all along. The D46SCE is one of the " Southwest" series. Your original post was in that forum. Take some time to read in the various threads on the Southwestern board and you'll probably find out more than you can anywhere else.

The D46 series includes a spalted maple guitar, but yours more likely has a solid spruce soundboard and either rosewood or maple sides and back. It is, no doubt, a very nice guitar.

Can you post photos of it? That would help a lot. Most of us seem to use Photobucket and if you use the IMG code in your posts your photos will appear in your posts.

Cheers!!

Dughy 8)

14
I'd be interested to know where this info is coming from. Our corporate security software shows nothing out of the ordinary.

2nd try...not sure where the first went...but I think I know where Ship may be getting his info, WEBgUy. Once you get into the forums, if you'll look on the "bar" at top where the URL is listed you should see at the far left side a small circle with what looks like an "i" inside of it. If you'll click on that circle you'll get a banner that says the website is not secure and lists a whole lot of "settings", some of which look like personal settings and some of which look more website/forum specific.

Just thought I'd let you know what I found.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)

15
Vintage and Rare Washburns / Re: Washburn D12W
« on: February 13, 2017, 06:03:36 PM »
If Washburn followed it's routine practice regarding your guitar, you have a Dreadnought size (a large size) guitar, but not as large as a "Jumbo".  Your guitar is probably all laminate construction (which would be appropriate for a beginner insrtument). As you have discovered from the FAQs there have been many different serial number formats...but if I had to guess I would guess it is a 1971 build (that is assuming you are accurate wigh the year you purchased it). Factory records were lost at one point in a fire, but sometime in the 1970s the Washburn name was resurected...I am just not sure WHEN in the 70's Washburn started production and retail sales.

There are others who are much more knowlegable who have access to "Blue Book" information, let's hope they will chime in.

As for whether or not investing in an all-lam guitar is a good idea...it might be OK, depending on how emotionally vested in the guitar you are. If the neck needs to be reset, that cost would probably exceed the value of the guitar, and a neck that needs to be reset can be the cause of a high action as you described. Other things, like a setup and fixing those small dings, can be economical enough to consider. I had a small ding "cleated" for about $20 and a decent setup from a good luthier or shop tech, complete with new strings, could run between $30 and $50... but at that point further investment may not be your best choice. A decent new (or gently used) beginner level Washburn guitar might be had for the cost of repairs (or less?) and that is a choice only you can make.

Could you post some photos (the General Discussion board has a tutorial on posting photos, look for a thread by our member t.y.)? If you can, a photo of the "break angle" where the strings course over the white part in the "bridge" could help us make a better informed recommendation.

Cheers!!

Dugly 8)

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