The Washburn Guitars Forum

Washburn General Forum => General Discussion => Topic started by: DontTreadOnMe on March 07, 2010, 05:33:11 PM

Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: DontTreadOnMe on March 07, 2010, 05:33:11 PM
Nick, your efforts and responses to suggestions have been recognized and appreciated by some of the forum members.

There have been a lot of suggestions to Washburn in other posts on a variety of product related topics, but I thought this would be a great place to capture serious suggestions and thoughts to feed back to Washburn from the Forum members.

All I can suggest is that we keep the suggestions and comments as  concise and specific as possible, and try - hard as it may be - to minimize the pokin' - OK, forget that, I know it's an impossible request anyway!

Nick, I would suggest making this a sticky, or start another thread as a general repository to solicit serious feedback.  

I'll go first...

Can Washburn have a 'checklist' that ALL vendors must go through before delivering an instrument? Much like a car dealer, to give a final once-over and make sure nothing was damaged during shipping, and give the customer higher confidence that the product they receive is what Washburn intended.

This comment goes back to my asking various vendors about the condition of an instrument, and the response being they check all that at the factory and at the Washburn warehouse.  I know that there are vendors that already do this for their customers based on other comments I have seen, Funky Munky is one that comes to mind, and that is very much recognized on the forum. All the WB vendors should give a final quality check before sending out an instrument.
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cedwards on March 26, 2010, 08:24:49 PM
+1 on DTOM's suggestion. A simple add . . . get guitars into bricks 'n' mortar stores . . . everywhere. Prime the sales guys. That's what sold me on my first Washie and look! I've bought three more since then. I've said it before: the product sells itself. Put it in peoples' hands. Period.
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: DontTreadOnMe on March 29, 2010, 01:23:10 PM
Shiner, I knew it was only a matter of time... but hey, it's a forum, with a good group that likes to 'discuss' - and that's what it's here for.  Like Rocket said in another thread - Nick has editorial power, he can thin out any posts he wants to.
Heck brother, I'm just glad somebody else added to this, I was just trying to get some forum brainstorming going.

BTW - maybe it needs to be a signature/photo model (That would be a photo of a bottle of Shiner Bock, of course!)
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Nagarajah on April 14, 2010, 01:22:38 AM
quote:
Originally posted by luvmyshiner

I would suggest marketing a Shiner approved signature guitar.  I would personal inspect every guitar which bears my signature and mark it with a Rocket approved method to prove it passes my strict standards.[8D]

(sorry Greg, couldn't resist it)

. . . because without beer, things do not seem to go as well . . .  Brother Epp, Capuchin Monastery, Munjor, Kansas  1902




That's a f****n great idea.  I was going to fill my guitar body with Shiner beer caps. [:D]
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: BGRooster1 on May 28, 2010, 10:07:11 AM
I myself look for shops that do this sort of final inspection.I would expect any reputable shop does this but maybe doesn't give a stamp or document of approval.
 It is plain to see that some shops don't.I see pics of guitars that would never see a consumer if this type of inspection was done.Surprising to see so many obvious laps in quality get out the factory door.
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: mapexzil on June 18, 2010, 01:12:22 AM
START SELLING DIME WASHBURNS AGAIN!!!

Washburn DIME2ST
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: darreno27 on July 21, 2010, 10:27:50 PM
Washburn needs more cool associations with their products instead of just adding metal artists to the roster.  I honestly think a washed-out 80s rock star is more noticeable than a new incoming metal band (unless of course the new metal band breaks the scene in high popularity)  I've talked to artist relations at Fender, Del Breckenfeld in relation to this (who was also Washburn's AR back in the early 90s).  A product can be amazing, but it is still a tough sell if there isn't some other association with it that makes a customer interested.

For example, I want a Peavey Vandenberg custom very badly.  I know the based on the neck profile specs I will most likely never seriously gig with the guitar (I only buy guitar I will gig with), but I want it anyway!  The guitars are unique in many ways regardless of the specs, and Adrian Vandenberg is a prolific artist who is still noticeable by many younger audiences.

Be it artist endorsements or vintage mojo, which is MUCH easier for Fender -  but either way a company needs it.  Unfortunately, this also requires the $, which I'm sure FMIC has more of in all departments.

--------------------------
www.vintagewashburn.com
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Ascension on June 16, 2011, 12:49:08 PM
Washburn simply needs to do 2 things if they want to really succeeed in the market.
First and foremost they need to beef up the dealers network. I live in the largest City in my State and there is only one tiny dealer for Washburn within 40 miles of me who has almost NO inventory. If folks never get a chance to pick up and play a Washburn they will simply not buy them!
Second GIVE THE PEOPLE WHAT THEY WANT!! The HM series for example. GREAT line that should have been a winner but what does Washburn do? Instead of hitting the entire line with a major marketing campaign and getting the guitars into the shops you guys DROP the line?? Has anybody there looked at just how many threads are running on boards about the HM's?? The WM 526 was a KILLER but few were produced and all that were production guitars had the soul less EMG's. The price was high but there was no flamed top option nor were any produced in a SSH set up. Also the WM 24 with the resin board was a winner but lasted what 2 years with NO marketing campaign to speak of?? Almost EVERY player who picks my 08 WM24 up is blow away by the guitar and these SHOULD have sold as fast as they could be built. However Washburn never got them out to the masses and properly marketed then. The reviews that were out there RAVED about the guitars but the public could never get their hands on them to see how good they really were so they did not ever really take off. Now you are dropping the cool headstock and phenolic board??
 Get a clue guys or fade away!!

Washburn USA's 1995 MG 102,120,122,1993 MG 104, One off Grover Jackson era Prototype , 1996 USA A-30,
Carvin  1990 X220C
Amps
 Zinky 25 watt Blue velvet
Zinky designed Fender Custom Shop Prosonic Black combo modded to a 1/12
 Marshall JCM 900 MK III High Gain Dual Master Volume 1/12.
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: serazac25 on September 24, 2011, 01:30:37 PM
They could always offer different things, most companys offer OFL, washburn should come with the OFL PRO, most come with EMG's ,
WB gives you Blackouts (at least as an option). And 24 fret Idols would be killer, like legit. And the x series was pretty neat, I have one of the low end discontinued models, pretty deece guitar for the price.
Hope they bring back the WM models, and THAT green finish, and a symetrical version of the WM would be nice, probably will capture
more eyes, since a lot of people are not fan of guitars that don't look traditional.
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: ds76 on October 19, 2011, 10:10:56 PM
I have an idea. I think you should start phasing out Chinese manufacturing and start making more guitars in the U.S. Now, before you dismiss me as a gingoistic reactionary, or give me a second grade explanation of labor costs and economic realities, just humor me for a few minutes. Are you  old enough to remember when you could walk into someone's home and see a Magnovox or RCA or Motorola telivision? What do you see in most peoples' homes now? Sony? Samsung? LG? Do you ever ask yourself why? The practice of American electronics companies shifting production overseas became popular when I was a kid. Back then, people considered anything made in Japan to be a cheap shoddy imitation of American products. As time went on though, the Japanese got better and better at building electronics and before you knew it, made in Japan was a mark of quality. Then something else happened. Small Japanese companies that we never heard of began marketing products in the U.S and elsewhere under their own names. These names are now very familiar to us; Kenwood, Kyocera, Sony, etc. And a lot of American brand names simply disapperared.
Now consider guitars. When the Washburn name was resurrected in the seventies, where did they make their guitars? Well I have a nice old Prairie Song made in Japan. A lot of companies made theirs in Korea, then Indonesia and finally in China. The first Chinese guitars were better suited to paddling a boat than they were to making music. But then they got better; and they're still getting better. A Chinese company called Biyang is marketing effects pedals under their own name in the U.S. Their website says they are coming out with their own brand of tube amplfiers. Do you see history repeating itself here?
Fast forward eight or ten years from now. You walk into a music store and see a couple of guitars on the wall. Both are made in the same factory, by the same Chinese workers out of the same woodpile. One of them says Washburn and costs $650. The other says Biyang and costs $350. Which one will you buy? Maybe sometime later as you sit playing your Biyang guitar you'll remember the old Washburn company and think how sad it was that they cut their own throats in search of short term profits.
Title: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on December 25, 2011, 09:53:02 PM
+1 on cedwards & Ascension.

Recall that great Luke Skywalker quote: If there's a bright center to the universe, you're on the planet that it's farthest from. Okay, that's kinda where I live. There are three official Washburn dealers within 100 miles of me. (In the same radius, there are seven Fender dealers.) One of 'em is a nice shop, & responsible for showing me how good modern Washburn & Oscar Schmidt acoustic guitars are. But at my last visit they had three Wash acoustics, one electric, & no basses.

I could probably find at least a hundred dedicated amateur players, in any musical niche you could name, yet there's no apparent effort to expose 'em to these great & affordable instruments.

resident troublemaker: http://forum.frugalguitarist.com/
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on February 05, 2012, 01:23:48 PM
I've been letting this run in my head, & I think I see part of the problem in getting word out about how great Washburn instruments are: diversity.

If I were to win Powerball & be able to be (IMO) a proper Washburn dealer, I'd open three shops:
Too many stores' websites proudly splash huge corporate logos all over the place... then you walk into the shop & find they don't actually STOCK even a single example of half those. "Oh -- but we can ORDER it for you!!" just does NOT cut the mustard. When someone walks in the door who looks like a credible customer, especially a first-timer, I tend to chat 'em up for two minutes, drag 'em over to a display, & proudly say "You really gotta try THIS." Bam -- emotional buy-in. Most won't buy right then-&-there, of course, but they're impressed that I have THEM in mind, & this greatly improves the chances of a near-future sale... something that ain't gonna happen by flipping through a catalog.

{No, I've not yet opened my own store, but there are at least five shops who've made the joke that I should be getting a commission, because I often know the stock better than their clerks.  8) I love guitars, & I support my fave dealers.}

First impressions are SERIOUS business. If a metalhead looks through the door & sees racks of lovely acoustics, he might never enter; conversely, if the front is clogged with flashy shred-machines, this could be chasing the country players away. If they're all mixed together, then everyone gets the impression the store doesn't give a damn about anyone.

And that's kinda where Washburn is.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: wn50 d10s12 h1260 ej200 on April 04, 2012, 10:12:23 AM
Hey,folks!Just a by'n'by thing-artist endorsements might do something for first-time buyers,but if you look at the previously posted "wish list",most intermediate and up players talk about what they like(body size,style,tonewoods,bracing,scale lengths,tuners,finishes,etc.),not who they want to play like.A vast majority of prolific guitarists play stuff they have built by individual luthiers or custom shops,no matter whose mass produced item it may resemble.Peace,out-and remember;my kids are better looking than your kids!-Jamie
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cfhmachado on May 12, 2012, 07:02:10 PM
Heres a few things that could really help washburn .
Bring back the idol and it's original shape. bring back the wm526 , even if was a ebony fretboard version. Some how bring the dime models back, even if they werent called dimes and had slight variations to them to make them legal. The x series were great aswell.
All these models need to be Offered as USA custom shop Models, that's what people really want!!!

And most importantly open that custom shop back up, and get those skilled guys back to work. Mid 90's - early 2000's you guys were putting out the amazing guitars. It was really insane to go from that to where we're at now.

As is I wouldn't  even buy a electric Washburn from the current cataloge(except for a nuno).

I own 10 USA custom shop Washburns dating to the yrs earlier mentioned , and they are all excellent .
That's what company needs to recreate , in order to survive amongst the current guitar market.

Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: aggtex on May 12, 2012, 08:50:59 PM
I don't think u are the first person who has requested these items! As of the Dime guitars , I think Washburn does own the Dime3 shape , someone correct me if I am wrong, cuz Deans is a little different but just can't put Dime at the headstock anymore, I think anyways..I am kind of glad , along with some other folks, that they stopped making Dime Washys..only cuz it makes all my others worth more & very rare.. Not trying to be selfish but I like it when not everybody owns the same items I do..The Dean USA Dimes are great models but we all know the finishes are not that great! This same topic was brought up awhile back, I know it sucks if you wanna buy a USA Washy Dime these days u gotta pay & arm & a leg ,& sometimes ur soul too! Good luck with your Movement! ;)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: aggtex on May 12, 2012, 08:54:08 PM
Meant to say glad Washburn stopped making them cuz Dean , even tho I like Dean too, they have flooded the market with the new Dime models!
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: t.y. on May 12, 2012, 09:42:49 PM
Around here,I see mostly O.S.  and very few Washburns. And these are at real Washburn dealers. Last time I was at the two KY, stores, there was not a single new Washburn. And maybe 1.5 dz. new O.S.   I would like to see a new 500.00  to  700.00  range guitar in person.  Last year I bought a new 850.00  Guild.  I would like to see and touch and play a real nice Washburn. My D10S's are all kick a##  but there only middle of the road.  Just my .02.    Tom.   :) :)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: t.y. on December 18, 2012, 01:52:43 PM
Sold that 2 inch neck Guild for 600.00 plus a hundred shipping. took a loss but learned, if it don't feel perfect when you buy it, it probably wont grow on  you.  LOL.  Tom.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: YerDugliness on December 18, 2012, 04:47:23 PM
I would like to see and touch and play a real nice Washburn. My D10S's are all kick a##  but there only middle of the road.  Just my .02.    Tom.   :) :)

Tom, keep your eye out for some of the USA Handmade Acoustics...WD78SW, WD82SW, WD84SW, there might have been WD76SW and WD80SW models, too.  These were made at the Washburn "factory" up until a few years ago.

As far as I know, all of them were spruce top guitars, but the secondary tonewoods may have varied.  For example, I think the sides and back on the WD84SW was Hawaiian Koa. 

I have had only one of them in my hands, a WD82SW built by John Stover, but it was the sweetest playing Washburn I've ever played (although my D61SW is a VERY close second).  One of our forum members (Strumsalot) who occasionally joined us Texas Washies at Pearl brought his....the action was so sweet that it rivaled any electric I've ever played.

They are expensive, but not as much as the Bourgeois models. The MRSP on the WD84SW I tried to get them to build for me was $2400, IIRC.  I'm glad it didn't work out in a way, the fretboard on the WD82SW I played was a bit narrow for me, I'm sure the WD84SW would have had the same neck.

Cheers!

Dugly 8)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: t.y. on December 18, 2012, 09:13:25 PM
Would love to see a Hawaiian Koa, even if I could not afford it.  My D10S"s are the highest level of Washburn I have seen,  Of course I have weeded out my guitars now, till there the best middle of the road guitars I can find.  Tom.   :)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: danielsan73 on May 25, 2013, 11:21:04 AM
 Washburn seriously need to get more dealers on board in the UK! In most of the shops you cant get washburn guitars, and when you can it's usually acoustic not electric. Having said that the ea20snb we were promised for Q2 2013 is seriously due and no info is forthcoming. Only one shop in the UK  I could find is selling the hb36 and that took some searching. Not sure how you sell products without having vendors or even supplies when promised.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: t.y. on May 25, 2013, 12:21:58 PM
"Not sure how you sell products without having vendors or even supplies when promised"    I have wondered that myself,  But I keep wishing  and looking.:)    Tom.  :)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: wrmurphy on May 25, 2013, 03:56:13 PM
Tom, that lends credence to the old saying, "You can't do business with an empty truck",

Murph
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: YerDugliness on May 25, 2013, 04:48:42 PM
Not sure how you sell products without having vendors or even supplies when promised.

Pretty common topic around here. Every time I am in a music store where Washburn's logo is on the window I look for them.  About half the time I find a few, but never many.  I always engage the owner in a discussion regarding the reason why they don't stock many.

I've gotten a variety of answers, but perhaps the most illuminating came from the owner of the music store here in Huntsville, TX, where I am living at the moment.  I went in for strings and as he was busy with a customer I picked up a guitar to pick while he was busy.  When he was done he came over and tried to sell me the guitar.  It was an OK guitar, nothing fantastic, so I told him of my appreciation for Washburn and suggested he try to become a dealer.  He told me he was already a Washburn dealer.  I was surprised b/c I saw not a one in the store, so a lengthy discussion ensued.  The bottom line was that he doesn't dedicate the capital to carrying the stock because it is not a name that customers come into the store and request.  We discussed my claim, my common claim when having this discussion, that if he would carry some stock they would sell themselves in comparisons against other similarly priced guitars.  His response?  Maybe so....but why bother, when he can sell a Fender or a Gibson or a Takamine to a customer who already has the brand in mind and comes in asking for it by name.  Hard to argue with that kind of a business decision....he's a man who knows what his customers want and has it in stock for them when they come in the door.

There could be all kinds of "which came first, the chicken (store stock) or the egg (brand name recognition/requests)" discussions, folks, but the bottom line to me seems to be that we for whom Washburn is a first choice must get the word out.  How many times have we heard that a Washburn plays easier or sounds better than a Martin (just one example, but in my experience the most common) once a customer who purchased one had the chance to join the forum?  It's a common occurrence.

BTW...I said the guy is a good businessman...he assured me he could get me new, first quality Washburns for less than I could find them anywhere else....just have to ask him to order them.  That is hard when there's nothing on the wall to test drive, but it seems to be the way my collection grows.  I bought a WMJ11S from  an online dealer just because I wanted something other than my dreadnought...liked it so much I bought two more WMJ21S models (my favorite tonewood combination) as well as a WGO26SCE (again, my favorite tonewood combination).  How many first time buyers would take that chance, though?

Cheers!

Dugly 8)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: philpm on May 26, 2013, 12:42:35 AM
Dug, completely agree with everything you said above.  The lack of knowledge not only hurts sales in the new market, but tends to also suppress demand and pricing on the secondhand market. 

Huge case in point:  Just yesterday, I did my usual weekly visit to one of our local pawn establishments.  A week or so ago, they had gotten in a nice EA16 in natural finish.  Its something I'm seriously considering going for here in the near future.  They are having a sale this weekend and one of the employees was just finishing up putting new price stickers on their current stock of guitars.  $50 price drop on the EA16 looked pretty good, but decided to just look around and see what else they had.  What I saw came as a huge shock.  The shop has had an RB-2500 5 string electric bass in there for a few months.  Not necessarily anything I particularly had in mind, but kept my eye on it for a while.  It had been priced at $300 every time I had seen it before.  They had it out on the main rack this time, so I looked at the sticker just to see what they had marked it down to.  I was sure I had seen it incorrectly the first time, so I pulled it down to make sure I saw it right.  I had:  $59.99.  Yes, this gorgeous, barely played 1999 Washburn 5 string bass had its price reduced by 80% in one fell swoop.  I couldn't pass it up, but couldn't buy it outright at the time, so I have it on layaway right now.

I checked it out on-line when i got home.  Not a lot of info, but a lot of very glowing reviews.  Finally found the initial list price to be $999.99.  Most used ones I've been able to find info for go for around $200-300.  And I've found this to be the case with almost every Washburn of any type, acoustic or electric, I find.  I've seen D10S's going for $70-100 lately around my area, which is just absolutely nuts for the quality of these guitars.  It really hammers home the idea of how brand recognition plays into the secondary market as well.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: t.y. on May 26, 2013, 02:52:58 AM
Wow 60.00   I agree,  a steal at that price.  The pawn shop in the town above me,  wants 250.00 for a dirty looking Peavey Millennium  5 string bass.  M.F. has them new with warranty free delivery for 300.00.   Tom.  :)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on July 20, 2013, 02:18:47 PM
Okay, I do get where the Huntsville music-shop owner is coming from. He is of course correct... but that's also the lazy way of selling.

If I saw some guy who was coming in every few days to ogle the midrange Martins or Taylors or whatever, I already know how I'd handle it. "Yeah, beautiful guitars. Treat 'em well & they just sound better by the day. Great resale value if you ever want to part with it." I'd hint that $2,000+ is a bit steep to learn on... but over here I've got these guitars that are about as good, for a fraction of the price. "If you want to move up in a year or two, I'll give you a good trade-in price."

Sure, it's cool that "my merch sells itself," but that calls to question why there'd even be a sales staff, except to dangle discounts & swipe the credit cards.

There are a couple of high-end stores in Minneapolis, & I love going into 'em -- once or twice a year. Down the street from both are non-boutique shops that I'd visit once or twice a week, because their stock (new & used) turned so often. Lots of stuff to try out, & the occasional bargain that I just couldn't pass up.

And those visits also mean that I was wandering past the new & higher-end merchandise, stopping to try out one or two, making a mental note as to how I could justify trading up to a better bass or whatever. I'd probably buy my strings & picks & straps & cords there, even if the prices aren't spectacular, because... well, that's where I shop.

Eventually, I want to open a store, not a museum. Imagining myself there, I'm not as worried about a new customer reaching for a WD160 as, say, a D-28. The latter has a higher cost without being a significantly better guitar, yet it "loses value" if you so much as look at it crosseyed.

And I know how many times I've gone into a shop to buy a guitar, thought better of it, & walked out with something different that caught my eye. This wouldn't have happened with a narrow, homogenous brand selection -- when a guy's not in the mood for a Gretsch, then he's probably not gonna buy a Gretsch; furthermore, if I'm not particularly into Gretsch (or that price range), why would I even stop into a Gretsch-centric store?

In that way, Washburn is ahead of many companies: they cover a lot of range. Like, there's nothing wrong with a dreadnought from Fender or Ibanez, & I've played some nice ones, but the Washburn name (& the tradition, with a few hiccups) has been attached to acoustic instruments for far longer than either of those companies has existed -- even predating their founders!! -- & Washies range from good to great to jaw-dropping, at any price. Autoharp players are a strange & secretive bunch ;D yet every one knows that a student MUST have at least an Oscar Schmidt -- it's been the solid benchmark for a century. As for electrics, 1980s axes like the Wing & Force & Bantam series are now considered classics. The "Dime" line had a rabid following all through its span; there's no reason the Nuno axes aren't better known, & the RX should be flogged to every budding shredder. For basses, I personally think the Taurus "thumb" design is ugly (& I'm not a fan of the rock-bottom stuff like the XB-100) but I have yet to play a disappointing Washburn bass.

There are still some marketing missteps. ("Yeah, 'some' he says!!") I'm a Johnny Winter fan from about 1973, & Jorma Kaukonen almost as long, & have thus always wanted a Firebird for the collection, because there's just nothing that sounds like those small metal-can minibuckers. You can't turn around without tripping over a half-decent Strat clone, LP copies are hardly rare -- even Washburn has sacrificed the Idol line to that -- but just try to find a good fake Firebird. But some excellent takes are kinda buried in the Paul Stanley line, when IMO they should be marketed for what they are, not to aging KISS fans. In a shop, these would sell themselves -- slap a Bigsby on a PS10, put it in the window, & it'll draw lustful stares.

First, though, market to retailers. Work with distributors like SLM to push prominent floor & window displays, not just banners. Set up pool ads. Create actual campaigns, national & regional & metro. Give good (not super-deep) discounts for steady purchases -- deep one-off discounts just lead to at-cost clearance sales, not steady customers.

Well, at least it'd be different from the failed "common wisdom" we've seen to date.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on July 27, 2013, 12:50:11 PM
LP copies are hardly rare -- even Washburn has sacrificed the Idol line to that
Not to harsh on Washburn alone. As has been lately called to my attention, Dean has their Thoroughbred line, a seemingly endless series somehow ALL-NEW yet "Classic-Inspired," a "bold new breed of single cut guitars"... that is pretty much nothing but a herd of Les Paul ripoffs, with all the cost yet none of the resale value of a Gibson.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: ChristosFp on March 17, 2014, 10:58:47 AM
hi there,
i´m new in the forum but a serious washburn fan specially of the WI series ( the original no the mark II version).

across the years i´ve tried as many brands and guitars as you could imagine but the Idol Series got my attention because of the features.

I always like the LP concept, but hate the fisical limitations, that was the reason i´d tried the SG standard; lovelly guitar, nice neck features, fret access and balls, but there where something missed.

The I found the Idol a nick catannese and beside the EMG pickups wich I dont like, the guitar was brilliiant, all the LP and SG features, but whith a self perspective and personnality, at a logic and adecuate price; the best of both worlds.

NOw I found the parallaxe series, awesome guitars.

Washburn is doing things rigth, but theres a huge gap in the video review area for the rest of the models acoustinc and electric, the ecuation its easy, if you can see it and here it you will buy it.

Also theres a big problem in the distribution area; I consider amazon is a big oportunnity to give the customer their products because you can´t find them in a dealers stores.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on March 18, 2014, 10:24:17 AM
Am I the only one who absolutely doesn't care about the dimes?

It's really simple what they need to do, get back in the big retail chains. Here in Canada they had a presence but went away around what... late 90s?

Now everyone only carries Gibson and Fender unless you hit the used shops and pawns.

Further, and I could be alone on this but:
If they could do anything right now I would say get into the AMP game with some high quality tube amps, the SS revolution is over and everyone want's to go back to tubes. If they came out with an affordable tube amp that was paired with the proper power tubes for the stock emg's they love so much they might be able to brand the guitars to the amps and get a presence in all spectrums of the guitar world for the "wash" sound.

I also admit, the Metal artists in the portfolio could be expanded to other genres. I *used* to play metal, and I'm so tired of explaining to people why my Washy sounds so as good when I play blues or doom metal or stoner rock etc just because it looks like something Dave Mustaine would endorse circa 1983
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: t.y. on March 18, 2014, 11:29:52 AM
?   Is Washburn some how involved with Roland amps, or used to be?  Tom.  :)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on March 18, 2014, 11:35:30 AM
?   Is Washburn some how involved with Roland amps, or used to be?  Tom.  :)

Don't know how involved they were to be honest, the Roland amps of the 80s are certainly some of the most desired amongst my circle of musicians so if they were involved they certainly should get back into it.

As you know I'm currently looking to replace my JC-120... the chorus on those babies is unmatched by any pedal or rackmount aside from perhaps the Fx500

Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: ChristosFp on March 27, 2014, 11:35:03 AM
Well theres a few suggestion related to IDOL model (not WIN IDOL)
1. most people like thick bodies, like the nick catanese idol with the same woods combination.
2. stop manufacture IDOL WIN guitars,
3. boost the IDOL model with best colors and woods variety
4. keep the toggle swtich in a LP style position not like SG, because its dificult to reach in live action.
5. Imporve the Headstock logo and inlays, F.E. the washburn logo in the 2008 IDOL catalag its simple, small and atractive.
6. stop using the USA logo its awfull.
7. the WI 145 heastock inlay will be ok for the low cost runs and the the new WI60V will be nice for the USA runs.
8. USE MORE YOUTUBE TO PRESENT YOUR PRODUCTS PLEASE, I LOVE THE BRAND BUT YOU BARELY CAN FIND PROPER VIDEOS

I hope it help you in some.

Greatings
FELIPE RONQUILLO
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: mrfrisky330 on May 02, 2014, 02:21:34 PM
Parallaxe guitars:

Provide a hardcase
At the very least make a hardcase for the parallaxe 8 string
Ship the 8 string a big enough box preferably a sturdy rectangular box like Fender/Gibson
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: nabla on May 18, 2014, 02:30:44 PM
HB17CBK Deluxe?

love the florentine cutaway and black hardware
Move volume closer to bridge humbucker for volume swells
pearl wing inlays
coil split humbuckers/push-pull tone pot
bigsby b7 vibrato
cedar top

and maybe a turquoise finish
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on May 19, 2014, 09:56:50 AM
Am I the only one who hates Coil Tap?
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: philpm on May 19, 2014, 07:00:45 PM
Am I the only one who hates Coil Tap?

I don't mind coil taps, but I've found it rare to find a guitar that does it well.  I've noticed that Fender's with coil-tapped humbuckers sound very weak with the humbucker tapped.  On the other hand, the current Epiphone Les Paul's with coil tap do a pretty nice job of getting a decent single coil tone without the huge loss of output.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on May 20, 2014, 08:07:11 AM
That the thing though, live, would you ever really use it?

I dunno, it just isn't something myself, or any other serious musicians really care for having in live situations.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: juicyjones on August 26, 2014, 12:25:41 PM
That the thing though, live, would you ever really use it?

I dunno, it just isn't something myself, or any other serious musicians really care for having in live situations.


I know you must regret adding 'or any other serious musicians' in there, because are obviously a huge number of serious musicians that use tapped or split coils. Also, I believe I'm serious, and I use mine. It never occurred to me that it was a test of musicianship whether or not I pulled that knob while I play.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on August 29, 2014, 11:43:58 AM
I think that statement was taken out of context, if I could rephrase I would say "amongst the performing musicians I know, none use coil-tap and in most cases go as far as to disable it".

Didn't mean for a sweeping statement of any kind.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on September 03, 2014, 08:12:30 AM
Also, if you want a "single coil" pickup why wouldn't you toggle to a P90? A split EMG or split Screaming Demon isn't going to sound anywhere near a P90 ;)

Maybe I just haven't played a guitar with coil tap on a pickup that takes it well (without hum and feedback).
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: philpm on September 03, 2014, 02:43:47 PM
Also, if you want a "single coil" pickup why wouldn't you toggle to a P90? A split EMG or split Screaming Demon isn't going to sound anywhere near a P90 ;)

Maybe I just haven't played a guitar with coil tap on a pickup that takes it well (without hum and feedback).

I can think of a reason.  After trying several P-90 equipped gits, I'm finding that I really don't like that sound all that much, but I did like the sound of the coil-tapped HB on the Epi Les Paul that I tried.  I even had an Epi SG with P-90's in it for a bit, and the sound was so brittle that I got rid of it as quick as I could after I bought it.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on September 03, 2014, 02:46:51 PM
Well, to each their own.. I know when it comes to playing loud and live I prefer my signal to be sourced from a solid P90. They have always been my go-to pickups to make any axe sound it's best.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: philpm on September 03, 2014, 05:44:56 PM
I'm finding that I really like something like a FilterTron or a mini-humbucker best, so that's more what I've been focused on finding lately.  I've just been finding the P-90's to be a little too buzzy when distorted, although they are pretty awesome clean.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on September 04, 2014, 09:06:05 AM
I use a P90 on the neck position for Clean and a SD Screaming Demon HB in the bridge position for distortion. That layouts always worked for me.

In any of my axe's that have a S-S-H or H-S-H configuation I always mod them to S-X-H (x= removed).

Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: fiveyearplayer on December 22, 2014, 12:55:15 PM
Hello.  First post here. Sorry if this is inappropriate.  I think this might be the appropriate topic, as opposed to starting a new thread.

What's the deal with Washburn?  Here's what I mean.


I have never seen one in person, but this looks like a cool guitar for the price, to me:  http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/washburn-pxl20-parallaxe-series-electric-guitar

Is the build quality going to be great?  The neck is smooth?

I've been playing 4.5 years. I own 8 Fenders:  six decent electrics (American Standard teles/strats, Japanese Mustangs, and one MIC modern player with perfect build quality), one (well made, great sounding MIC) acoustic, and one American Standard P bass.

My first ever guitar, bought from Best Buy online in the summer of 2010, site unseen, when I knew nothing, was an "Oscar Schmidt by Washburn" Idol copy--you know, a $150 "starter guitar."  I loved it and I miss it--wish I had not sold it.

I recently bought my daughter a Washburn 3/4 size RX6--very nicely made and blows away the $99 Squier competition in 3/4 size guitars.

Washburn is a storied old American company, from what I've read.

The new parallaxe stuff looks amazing.

But what's the deal? Where is Washburn?  Where are the endorsers?  Why is the product not in stores?

Like..... what is the deal?

I feel like I want my next guitar to be a Washburn.  I like (despite owning Fenders up until now) to be different.  I feel like Washburn is a secret weapon/unknown untapped amazing guitar company.

Up until now I stuck with Fenders because as a newbie I wanted to be sure I was getting decent quality that would not hold back my development.  Now that I have been playing over 4 years, I know what to look for using my own hands and eyes and ears....  my daughter's RX6 sounds as good as my $1300 artist series fender.  The neck is nice.  I imagine the $900 parallaxe is going to be a great guitar if I order it online.  Seems to be true that mods not needed -- SD pickups, nice tuners, etc.

Why is Washburn, it appears to me, almost not known?  Not even as much as Ibanez, even Chapman guitars, ESP, etc?

Why does Anderton's guitars in UK (great youtube page for reviews, many probably know) not stock Washburns and review and rave over them?  The Cap'n and Chappers were raving the other day about an affordable ($600) PRS thats aimed at shredders.  Cool--I'm sure that's a great guitar.  But it seems like Washburn is putting out some cool stuff too--where is the marketing?  where are the dealers?

Is there a corporate plan?

I have read other comments seeming to notice what I'm talking about... no dealers, no washburn guitars in real brick n mortar stores
???
















Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on December 26, 2014, 01:29:07 PM
But what's the deal? Where is Washburn?  Where are the endorsers?  Why is the product not in stores?

Why is Washburn, it appears to me, almost not known? ...where is the marketing?  where are the dealers?

Is there a corporate plan?
Welcome aboard! ...but, yeah, that's kinda what this thread is about: people who've had multiple positive Washie experiences & want to ask WTF, DUDES?!?!? about the near-total lack of marketing presence.

Signature models/editions? Yah, that concerns me. Consider Fender's little brother, Squier -- for bass alone they have Troy Sanders, Eva Gardner, Chris Aiken, Mikey Way, Mike Dirnt, & Pete Wentz, besides guitar endorsers Joe Trohman (ironically, a former Idol endorser), J Mascis, John 5, Deryck Whibley, & Avril Freakin Lavigne (not to overlook the non-US models for O-Larn & Ehsaan Noorani).

See, for the past five-or-so years I haven't listened to (or watched) much in the way of "current hits," & EVEN --==I==-- readily recognize MORE THAN HALF of those thirteen names.

Meanwhile, Washburn can't figure out if it wants to primarily be country, folk, death metal, hair metal, power pop, grunge... so their main (Washburn) line presently touts Richie Owens, Willie K, Warren Haynes, Ola Englund, & Nuno Bettencourt. That's five... of which I readily recognize two.

I work in a place where we build transit buses for a couple hundred North American cities. I'm a mechanic with corporate experience. Years back, I asked a gaggle of plant managers, "We can focus on working fast... OR quality... OR build-to-build consistency... OR neatness. Which one should be our Number One priority?"

They looked baffled, exchanged glances, then one spoke for the rest -- "Why, they're ALL important!!"

 :o

As a result of this blurriness, we waste a LOT of time & effort (& more than a bit of cash) just trying to figure out what Corporate HQ or Engineering or Plant Management or the vendors or installers or customers' inspectors are really saying because EVERYTHING is Number One Priority at all times...

So it looks to me (IMNSHO) like Washburn has a nice pile of Number One priorities. To borrow from Buddy Pine, "When everyone is special, no one will be special." When more than one thing is Number One, then by definition nothing CAN be Top Priority, so it ALL drifts toward triviality.

Washburn could easily make Lyon their Squier (quality beginner/occasional instruments), & Oscar Schmidt their Fender Standard MIM (intermediate & utility guitars). Instead, the main site looks like Squier, the OS site looks like Bullet, & Lyon Online doesn't exist.

They could focus on Big Store marketing OR online presence OR small-store nodes. They could align their name with ONE talent-seeking television program for an entire season. They could focus on players listened to by teens OR mid-twenties OR thirtysomethings OR middle-agers like me OR metal OR bluegrass OR alt-pop.

When the instructions say CHOOSE ONE, then even a random pluck is better than all-or-nothing.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: psp742 on December 27, 2014, 12:01:12 AM
I believe what you guys say are true, Washburn Management is so out of touch and have no direction they are headed that it affects peoples perception... There are limited number of endorse artist, Nuno Bettencourt, Ola Englund, (others i don't even know who they are) Stu Hamm (may not be the best but he left Washburn...) they need a good bass player, Tal Wilkenfield (is beautiful and talented).. there are many up and coming bass players who need sponsorship... but Washburn is set in their ways i guess.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on January 24, 2015, 02:20:18 PM
I wish to say one unequivocally positive thing about Washburn --

Thank you for maintaining these Forums.

Sure, I wish there was more activity -- when I spot a Washie player locally, I mention the place, but that's a slow process for community-building.

But, aside from some of the Big Players, very few guitar brands offer any sort of "community" support -- just TRY to find something specific to (say) Cort, Aria, Hondo, AXL...

And many of the forum sites that do exist are loaded up with ads &/or Flash &/or cookies/tracking bots that drag down site response.

This is a clean, fast site, & I can enjoy checking in when I have a few minutes -- laptop or Android -- no matter how slow my connection.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: EspyHop on February 01, 2015, 02:02:08 AM
I think U.S. Music should create a seperate brand for all of the metal guitars (Parallaxe would be a great brand name) and make Washburn a more universal brand.  I'd keep the Idol, P, and hollow body guitars as Washburn, but the rest would go to Parallaxe.  Washburn is a classic, vintage brand with a history and appeal that should be  wide reaching.  The sheer number of  metal guitars alienate players from other genres. 

As far as the acoustic line, I would expand the solid wood line to include non-dreadnoughts/parlors.  I'd especially like to see an all solid wood Lakeside Jumbo.   

I'd redesign Idol  to a 25 inch scale, 24 frets, a tremolo, locking tuners, and push-pull pots for coil splitting, series/parallel, and phase.  Make it a real workhorse.  Anybody who has had to lug around, tune, and play two or three guitars for a recording session understands the value in that.  That's why PRS has a lot of fans amongst working guitarists of all styles.   

Finally, distribution and marketing needs to be significantly expanded.  It's harder than hell to find a Washburn in my town.  It's a real shame, because I've only recently realized what a quality value they are.  I just got a used WD54SW off of Reverb ($235 shipped with hardshell case), and it's by far the best acoustic neck I've ever played on. 
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: JuanAnthony on March 22, 2015, 12:58:43 PM
May be they want not to spend millions on Marketing and famous endorsers but in QUALITY. And that can be the case of normal people feeling astonished when they play a good Washburn for the first time, they feel amazed about the quality. And that was my case when I first bought my D10STS acoustic years ago, or my new EA20 electroacoustic, I was impressed by the quality and the prices. May be if Washburn became more famous they would not be the same... but it is only a supposition.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Sextant1951 on March 23, 2015, 07:55:34 AM
Well said, JuanAnthony....well said. Often I have thought the same, when thinking of Washburn Guitars. I first heard of Washburn in the mid-late 70's, when a friend of mine purchased a Washburn acoustic, don't remember the model, don't remember if it was high end or low end, but, I've always remembered the sound, the feel, the quality, the playability of that guitar..that vibe has never left me. "And that can be the case of normal people feeling astonished when they play a good Washburn for the first time, they feel amazed about the quality. And that was my case when I first bought my D10STS acoustic years ago, or my new EA20 electroacoustic, I was impressed by the quality and the prices. May be if Washburn became more famous they would not be the same"....an excellent post, it brings up a lot of good points.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: YerDugliness on March 23, 2015, 04:44:11 PM
May be if Washburn became more famous they would not be the same... but it is only a supposition.

Not just a supposition...truth! I visited my local music shop and mentioned to the owner that I was a fan of Washburns and he told me that he could get any Washburn I wanted at a good price. I asked why he doesn't stock any in his store and his answer was that it was difficult to justify the financial investment when nobody comes in and asks for them. He says he can sell all the Alvarez guitars and Fender guitars and....etc., etc., etc...that he can stock because that is what people know and ask for when they come in to his store. Sure, he said, he could try to talk the buyers into trying the Washburns, but he said why try when they already pretty much know what they want when they come in.

Hard to argue with that sort of logic....no?

...and, then again, there may be another possibility that I hadn't considered....did you mean by "...Washburn would...not be the same..." that their quality would suffer? Just curious here... ???

Cheers!

Dugly 8)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on March 23, 2015, 11:23:26 PM
Marketing/advertising is largely deductible against taxes. Every time you watch a sporting event, you see hundreds (if not thousands) of instances.

I don't believe that Washburn has any use for some massive advertising campaign. But when's the last time you saw a TV ad for ANY guitar brand? Maybe flashing past from Guitar Center -- that's about it.

However, Washburn certainly COULD sign on as a sponsor to a few television programs such as America's Got Talent or The Voice, where they provide their distinctive guitars & basses to those performers that use them, as well as any "house" musicians.

Washburn is a division of U.S. Music Corp, which also owns Jay Turser, Randall, Oscar Schmidt, & Parker; they distribute (among others) Warwick/Framus, Hagstrom, Marshall, & Eden. Those offer some well-esyablished brands to be paired up with the guitars.

What Washburn really needs, though, is brand recognition. When the name was relaunched in the late 1970s, I already knew it from my exposure to old guitars, like pre-1940s -- of course, there's no relation whatever between THAT "Washburn" & the present company, but that led me to actually test-play their electric guitars, giving 'em a chance to show what they could do.

What I want to see is simply a matter of getting the word out. Okay, Washburn COULD give up on bottom-end electric guitars -- Lyon would be a MUCH better home for the cheap bolt-neck "Nuno" & the RX10/6/20, & maybe even more-midrange models like the XM, or the previous X-10/11/12/20 & WI-14/15/24/36; these are "commodity" guitars & would primarily go to supply Big Box discount chains & retailers. That would leave The W better able to focus on getting attention for their upper-end models.

Same for acoustics. No, there's nothing BAD with the WD-10... but if a potential buyer hasn't tried something better, like an all-wood parlor or a WD-30 or a Southwest, then he's not only missing out on play that is at least an order of magnitude better, but also sorta proves my point: he'd quickly associate the "Washburn" name with "rather good CHEAP guitars" as opposed to quality. (He'd need to at least try one of their $1,000+ guitars, to have any idea what I mean.) As cool as the WD-10 etc. are, they'd be better as Lyon or Schmidt, rather than weighting down Washburn.

Even your Festival. Yah, excellent axe, but it's dragged down by the EA-10/12/14/16/etc. -- if not for all the time, energy, & cash expended on those, maybe Washburn would still be producing models like the EA-45S or or EA-52SW.

Would success kill Washburn's quality? Would winning $500,000,000 in the lottery turn you into a worse person? The future is unclear, but I can guess you wouldn't mind giving it a try.  :)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on March 25, 2015, 11:45:28 AM
I think U.S. Music should create a seperate brand for all of the metal guitars (Parallaxe would be a great brand name) and make Washburn a more universal brand.  I'd keep the Idol, P, and hollow body guitars as Washburn, but the rest would go to Parallaxe.  Washburn is a classic, vintage brand with a history and appeal that should be  wide reaching.  The sheer number of  metal guitars alienate players from other genres. 

As far as the acoustic line, I would expand the solid wood line to include non-dreadnoughts/parlors.  I'd especially like to see an all solid wood Lakeside Jumbo.   

I'd redesign Idol  to a 25 inch scale, 24 frets, a tremolo, locking tuners, and push-pull pots for coil splitting, series/parallel, and phase.  Make it a real workhorse.  Anybody who has had to lug around, tune, and play two or three guitars for a recording session understands the value in that.  That's why PRS has a lot of fans amongst working guitarists of all styles.   

Finally, distribution and marketing needs to be significantly expanded.  It's harder than hell to find a Washburn in my town.  It's a real shame, because I've only recently realized what a quality value they are.  I just got a used WD54SW off of Reverb ($235 shipped with hardshell case), and it's by far the best acoustic neck I've ever played on.

If the number of "metal" guitars alienate musicians then they clearly aren't musicians with any knowledge. When you think of an Explorer do you think of Clapton or Bob Mould? Better yet Gibson do you suddenly discredit them as making any quality instruments because of the SG or Flying V? What about big name Luthiers like Larivee who started off making Shred worthy Axes in the 80s before moving into Acoustics and becoming a legend.

I find comment pretty ill conceived to be fair, Washburn is mostly known for their Dime's, N4's and Acoustics right? 2 of the first 3 are for people who play metal. I play in 3 gigging bands, yes one is crossover/thrash but that doesn't mean that as an educated buyer I wouldn't be looking at specifically Washburns and Takamines when searching for a fair priced but great sounding acoustic.

I dunno, I just don't agree with that statement at all..  specially when late 80s washburns are in such high demand amongst a lot of metal playing circles and probably helps drive a bit of the name to this day.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on May 03, 2015, 03:47:53 PM
Though it pains me to be reasonable ;D I find myself somewhere between the previous two posts.

Do "heavy metal" brands "alienate" some of the market? While it's uncomfortable to think of fellow musicians as possibly harboring image-conscious dilletantes... well, there could be some truth there, going both ways. Speaking for myself, when I'm shopping for a crunchy distortion pedal, if the shop is library-quiet then I'm MUCH less likely to crank it up; then again, if I'm trying out archtop acoustics, some 15-year-old cranking out bad Megadeth chords (on a rig he'd never afford anyway) is not conducive to the experience.

The "original" Idol series seems to bridge various chasms, showing up in the hands of players doing metal, country, hard rock, jazz, shoegaze -- pretty much anything.

Washburn turns out great death-metal instruments, & great bluegrass instruments. Sure, monsters like Fender cover a similar range, but the fact is that Washburn dealers usually have such a small selection that it all gets crammed in a corner (or two: electric & acoustic), where the Fenders would get major display space, leaving plenty of room for the various "tribes" to not step on each other's toes. Even at the smallest Fender dealer that I know of, the guitars & basses are on opposite walls.

As for the bulk of EspyHop's post, I mostly agree. One exception: leave the core Idol alone -- IMNSHO, it should remain "Gibsonish," with 22 frets & 24.75" scale & stoptail, with the X lines being "Fenderish" (24 frets, 25.5", various trems, & at least a token effort to use single-coil pickups). An occasional short-run Idol with a Bigsby or Wigsby or Kramer would be kinda cool, though, & maybe a custom "tone package" option with all the split/phase switching & the unloved VCC.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on May 04, 2015, 02:28:01 PM
I can jive with that Tony, makes sense imo



Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on May 21, 2015, 08:58:05 AM
And I reiterate: speaking only for myself, I criticize Washburn because I think they're one of the world's best brands & deserve all the associated recognition/profit.

A month ago, industry analyst Eric Garland posted an excellent (if tentative, IMNSHO) analysis of the current state of guitar retail:
http://www.ericgarland.co/2015/04/17/the-radical-future-of-musical-instrument-retail/ (http://www.ericgarland.co/2015/04/17/the-radical-future-of-musical-instrument-retail/)
One of his points is that, rather than compete with the Internet, shops should be smaller &/or cater to a narrower niche &/or create returning clientele &/or offer stuff hard-to-find on the Net.

And Washburn would be a perfect vendor in most (if not all) of those factors:As an example of that last, here's another article, giving one shop's story of why they ended their decades-long Fender affiliation:
http://www.msretailer.com/msr/fired-fender/ (http://www.msretailer.com/msr/fired-fender/)
Most telling for me, though, was this closing comment:
Quote
We admitted to ourselves that we had been afraid we wouldn't be perceived as a "real" music store by giving up a marquee brand name. However, as soon as our new philosophy was put into practice, we realized our fears were unfounded.

We live in a fortunate time when there are more great brands and quality products to choose from than ever before. Now that we aren't spending so much of our buying power in one place, we are free to explore other brands. These are not B-level brands without any name recognition, either.

We have acquired lines -- some of them include Duesenberg, Reverend, EarthQuaker, Marshall and Washburn -- with buy-in requirements that we consider more favorable, all while getting better margins.
HEY WASHBURN -- they're READY to listen to you. Start making phone calls RIGHT NOW. Send an actual flesh-&-blood rep NEXT WEEK.
...or admit that you don't care if the company goes to hell. :(
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on May 25, 2015, 09:43:49 AM
couldn't have said it better man.

And fwiw, I HATE Fender and Gibson. Or shall we refer to them as I sue everything and I sue everybody?

"Oh, your guitar has a *insert shape here*, and it's selling well? *sue sue sue sue sue*

So sick of that s**t.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: YerDugliness on May 26, 2015, 03:36:33 PM

"Oh, your guitar has a *insert shape here*, and it's selling well? *sue sue sue sue sue*

So sick of that s**t.

There really ought to be a way to stop that sort of frivolous lawsuits...nobody can "copyright" a chord progression, so nobody should be able to "patent" or get any other rights to the shape of a guitar's body or headstock. I understand the need to protect a person's intellectual property, but at some point things must become part of the "public domain" once they become well known.

So what if somebody else makes a guitar with a body shape of a Strat or a Les Paul....as long as they do not represent themselves and their products as being related to Fender or Gibson, why should they care? I could understand if they are trying to protect some sort of proprietary tdchnology, but just a shape?

...and with the range of sounds that ANY guitar can produce, protecting a "sound" is as elusive as finding that pot of gold at the end of a rainbow (why are those pots of gold always at the OTHER end when I manage to catch up with those rainbows?   ???)

Cheers!

Dugly 8)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on May 28, 2015, 01:53:16 PM
on point man, I have a hard time supporting Charvel since Fender purchased them... I haven't even played my Charvel's since actually and even sold one.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: Tony Raven on May 30, 2015, 01:07:42 PM
I've got no gripe about a big company buying up a successful smaller company to give it better stability & marketing reach. What bugs me is when the big company comes in to stifle a competitor. Look at what FMIC's clout has done for Hamer, Guild, Jackson, Charvel, Sunn, Tacoma, LP, Ovation, Genz Benz, Gibraltar, Takamine...

On the sales end, they dangle the "Official Fender Dealer" carrot, then demand you buy specific models, often at less discount than you get for other brands while offering deep cuts to the Big Box stores that already beat up on the mom-&-pops. And you can't even advertise your USED Fender selection because that might compete with some other store's NEW selection.

Ain't it cool how the "free-market" actually operates?

Washburn certainly has a low hurdle to clear!! All they really have to do is get their corporate butt off the bench & into the race -- preferably BEFORE the field is packed.
________________

Sorry to repeat myself, but I am adamant in my analysis. 8)

The full Classic Idol line can beat up on Epi LPs & even many of the Gibbo versions, while the X Family carves out chunks of Squier -- ramp up Lyon & go toe-to-toe with Affinity models.

There's thousands of shellshocked Hamer fans wandering around who'd LOVE another reissue of the Stage & Wing series.

Oh, yeh: STOP putting out generic $100 "Randall" crapbox amps, & STOP diluting your (paid) endorsers' market value. THE KH15 IS NOT FOOLING ANYONE. At least the NB15 makes an effort to LOOK unique. If your intent is to cash in on the "beginner" & "fanboy" niches, then follow Fender & Marshall: put out a line of cool-looking TOY "mini" amps that also happen to be decent-sounding practice amps/preamps/overdrives. But that is ALL -- after that, minimum buy-in should be comparable to (say) midrange Fender, call it $350 MSRP, & leave the low-end low-margin amps to others. Again: quality, quality, quality.

(FWIW, there's an RT-50H sitting about twenty feet away from me this very moment, & I'll eventually get an older "redline" combo.)

Do a better job of putting "Washburn" & "Randall" into the same thought. Good HEAVENS, but there's already Nuno & Ola, & there was Dimebag before!! Make a few more Washburn Custom Shop models, then order two tiers of import version for the fans, kinda like the WI14 was to the WI64 (or even the WI64 to the WI66).

PLAY TO YOUR STRENGTHS -- though Washburn (& Randall) make GREAT all-round gear, the FACT is that they've already got cachet in METAL. Sure, fine, Washburn covers much more territory than just metal, but at least it'd be SOMETHING solid upon which to build. Here's just a few (hundred!!) places you could scour to build brand reach --
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_heavy_metal_festivals (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_heavy_metal_festivals)
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: cmac84 on June 02, 2015, 08:26:38 AM
What turns me off from almost every single Washburn (new) is that I always know I'm going to have to swap the pups. Just put in the extra $75-100 in the cost and offer models with active and passive selections with different but well known pup configs. (SD-AH15, EMGs etc). The crap stock pups alwaaaaaaays ruin it when I see a kid pickup a Washburn in a store. They don't understand the value is in the rest of the build most of the time, but hey, if it sounds crap it sounds crap, stop it!

:)

Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: JohnWilmerding on June 16, 2015, 07:37:45 AM
Alerting WB folks to a misspelling in the on-line catalog:

Washburn Heritage 40 Series | EA40SCE

OVERVIEWSPECSVIDEOSIMAGES

The Washburn Heritage 40 Series of acoustic guitars feature solid Alaskan sitka spruce tops, flame maple back and sides and gold hardware. Maple has a brighter sound than mahogany or rosewood so these guitars tend to sound clearer and more articulate. This works out especially well for the larger bodied jumbo versions that might loose focus ...

"loose" should be spelled "lose" ... it's a common error of misspelling.
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: firstrebel on August 23, 2015, 04:08:56 AM

Why does Anderton's guitars in UK (great youtube page for reviews, many probably know) not stock Washburns and review and rave over them?  The Cap'n and Chappers were raving the other day about an affordable ($600) PRS thats aimed at shredders.  Cool--I'm sure that's a great guitar.  But it seems like Washburn is putting out some cool stuff too--where is the marketing?  where are the dealers?

A lot of Andertons Washburn's are in their warehouse not the store. There are a lot of UK dealers who advertise Washburn's  but they have to be ordered from the Distributor.

I think the other thing WB need to sort out is what guitars come with cases, irrespective of country. Or make all the range of cases available like Epi does. The 'depending on market' is confusing. I bought a Lakeside Jumbo in the UK and it came with a case (K on the end of the model number). So one assumes that the UK is a market that gets cases. When I ordered the Solo Deluxe, shown on the UK distributors site as having a case and ends in K, I find the box had the K on the label but no case.

Seems all this model were shipped to the UK with no cases. I emailed USMC in the USA and got a very short reply that cases are market dependent, they are not sold separately, but can place a special order through the dealer. How confusing is that?

I got back to them and they sent me the email address of the European distributor. So far no reply. It seems odd to me that the Solo Deluxe is a more 'prestigious' model than the Lakeside but did not have a case. Not too sure how I stand here in the UK with Trading Standards on this.

Bob
Title: Re: Hey, Washburn, we have an idea!
Post by: kenedy on February 21, 2016, 02:52:07 PM
I support your idea.