Username: Password:

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - evenkeel

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 127
16
Over the years Washburn used the same model numbers for different guitars within the festival series.  They also used names, Monterey for example and used the same name in different guitars.  They also changed specs, sometimes dramatically, within the same model.  Washburn would also contract with a big box retailer and make a variation of a model just for that retailer.  All in all this makes the festival series very confusing.  As you've found out some models, like the one you reference, have little to no info about them.

The serial number does indicate it was built in 1999.  My guess is it's a all laminate guitar.  Probably built as an exclusive (a'ka limited) for a retailer.  Most of the festival series was built that way, although a few have solid wood tops.  All of the festival series guitars were built for stage work.  For thatera, they were very good stage guitars.  The acoustic tone suffers somewhat due to the thin body, laminate construction and solid bracing.  Electronics have come a long way since then, so now there a better electro/acoustic options.

17
Congrats on the slope shoulder Washie.  I'm also a fan of the slope.  I have two in the herd now.  A very nice Gibson J15, sitka and walnut.  And a Martin custom, 12 fret clear, slope shoulder, paddle headstock, adi and Indian rosewood.  The appointments are a mix of D28 and d45 style.  I'm interested in hearing how your Washburn slope works out for you.

18
Good luck with it all Dugly.

If you decide you want to try a few other options here are some good pieces of equipment that will work well.  I would not hesitate to buy this kind of stuff online.  It's pretty cookie cutter and any of these options will perform a lot better than what you have.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fishman-Loudbox-Mini-PRO-LBX-500-60-Watt-Acoustic-Amp-FAST-FREE-SHIPPING-/252940063353?hash=item3ae4671279:g:G3wAAOSw-3FZGeJr

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Roland-Cube-ST-Cube-Street-Battery-powered-Guitar-Combo-Amplifier-Black-New/331794821593?_trksid=p2045573.c100505.m3226&_trkparms=aid%3D555014%26algo%3DPL.DEFAULT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20150817211623%26meid%3D341f478c37264cf3991836f5def0d812%26pid%3D100505%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26

FWIW I own a street cube and use it for farmers markets gigs when electricity is not available.  It works really well.  Great sound, good effects and runs a long time on 6 aa batteries.  Also runs on standard 110 volt.

For a bit more you can get a bigger version, also battery power as an option.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Roland-AC-33-Battery-Powered-Acoustic-Guitar-Amp-Used-/182585690873?hash=item2a82f48af9:g:xYsAAOSwX9FZIat4

and one more good option from Peavey.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Peavey-Ecoustic-E208-Acoustic-Guitar-Amplifier-2-Channel-30-Watt-2-x-8-Combo-Amp-/201811902772?hash=item2efced4134:g:NugAAOSw3v5YsLtl

19
Before you hit reply try highlighting the entire text, then copy (Control C).  If you get the "fails to respond", you'll at least not loose what you wrote.

20
The fender amp you bought will work, but with some limitations.  Couple of observations.

Both inputs are 1/4".  The preferred option is a XLR input for the mic and a 1/4" for the guitar.  Some PA's and amps now use a combo jack that can accept a 1/4" or a XLR.  With only 1/4" jacks as an option you will have a tough time finding good quality mics.

Another limitation is the reverb control.  It controls whatever is coming out of the amp.  You cannot adjust for each channel.

The amp you purchased is really for use as a combo guitar amp, not a small PA.  It's not really set up to handle vocal and guitar.  It will work, but with pretty severe limitations.

I hate to further rain on your parade but you also overpaid.  That amp can be bought for something in the $125-$150 range.  Here is a local Cl ad for one.  Sorry Dugly.

https://baltimore.craigslist.org/msg/6092689790.html

21
Vintage and Rare Washburns / Re: Washburn D61 SWN 1982?
« on: May 12, 2017, 11:39:51 AM »
Welcome to the forum. Your D61SW N is a all solid wood guitar.  Hence, the "SW" in the model designation.  The "N' equals natural finish top.

Serial # info.
Either the first 2 digits, or the first digit, are typically used to identify the year of manufacture.
For example, 8901827 indicate the instrument was made in 1989, 1988, or 1998. Instruments with serial numbers that have 5 or more characters are from the late 1980's-2000's
Instruments with serial numbers that have 5 characters or less are typically from the 1980's.
Instruments with serial numbers that have 4 characters are from the 1970's and early 1980's.
For instruments produced after 2010, usually the first 4 digits can indicate the year of manufacture.

And some info on your D61
D61 S(W) PRAIRIE SONG
- dreadnought style, solid spruce top, round soundhole, rosewood pickguard, three-stripe bound body, five-stripe rosette, rosewood back/sides, mahogany neck, 14/20-fret rosewood fingerboard with pearl dot inlay, rosewood bridge with pearl dot black pins, rosewood veneer on peghead, three-per-side chrome diecast tuners, available in Natural finish, mfg. mid-1980s-1994.
Grading 100% Excellent Average
N/A $550 - 650 $325 - 400
Last MSR was $1,200.
Add $100 for Equis II electronics.
In 1992, the W was dropped from the name. In 1994, ovankol back/sides replaced rosewood.

So my guess is your guitar was made in 1988.  Washburn has had a rather inconsistent and confusing serial number system over the years

22
Festival Series / Re: need help idenitying
« on: May 09, 2017, 09:59:28 AM »
Welcome to the forum.  Your EA20 was built in 1999.  It was not built in the USA, most likely China.  Some earlier off shore production was in Korea (Samick factory), but by 1999 production had shifted to China.  The EA 20 was part of the festival series; thin bodied, electric/acoustic.  Designed for stage work.  The EA 20 was one of the better selling guitars of the festival series.

Here is some blue book skinny.

EA20 (NEWPORT/WOODSTOCK)
- thin single sharp cutaway thin body, select spruce or mahogany top, oval soundhole, bound body, three-stripe rosette, mahogany back/sides/neck, 14/21-fret rosewood fingerboard with pearl dot inlay, matching headstock with three-per-side Grover diecast tuners, rosewood bridge with pearl dot white pins, acoustic bridge pickup, Equis electonics, available in Black, Tobacco Sunburst, White, Woodstone Blue, Woodstone Brown, or Woodstone Silver finish, mfg. mid 1980s-2000.
Grading 100% Excellent Average
N/A $400 - 475 $250 - 300
Last MSR was $1,000.
In 1992, Woodstone finishes were disc. In 1993, Natural finish was introduced. In 1994, a select spruce/mahogany top replaced regular mahogany and White finish was disc. Until 1994, this guitar was referred to as the Newport. In 1995 only, this guitar was called the Woodstock, which is not to be confused with other Woodstock models (EA40). In 1996, Equis Gold electronics replaced Equis II. In 2000, Equis Plus electronics replaced Equis Gold.

EA20 SDL
- similar to the EA20, except has a solid cedar or spruce top, abalone rosette, quilted maple back and sides, maple neck, bound 14/21-fret rosewood fingerboard with dot inlay, Natural wood headstock with three-per-side chrome tuners with ebonite buttons, rosewood bridge, Equis Chorus/B-Band electronics, Buzz Feiten Tuning System, available in Natural finish, mfg. 2001-present.
Grading 100% Excellent Average
MSR $900 $650 $400 - 475 $250 - 300
In 2002, a solid spruce top replaced the solid cedar and B-Band electronics replaced Equis.


23
The Behringer Tony suggests looks like a nice, small PA/monitor.  One small caveat, you will not be able to adjust the EQ for guitar/voice independently.  For example, if you want a mid range scoop for the guitar and a bass boost for vocals you're out of luck.  May or may not be an issue for you.  Just something to consider.

24
I'll also add a thumbs up for Roland equipment.  I have a small Roland Street Cube I use for farmers market gigs where electricity is not available. It uses 6 AA Batteries and will last 6-7 hours at modest volume levels.  You can also operate off standard 110 power.  It has a 1/4" and a XLR input.  Some surprisingly good effects, reverb, chorus, etc.  Simple EQ controls.  Very nice piece of equipment.

FWIW Dugly a few simple effects are a good thing.  Just a three EQ controls; low end, mid and treble, plus a bit of reverb go a very long way. 

25
For most acoustic players a tube amp is a non starter.  The tubes will colour the sound.  You can't get around that.  Most acoustic players want the amp to do nothing, just make the natural sound of the guitar louder.  A tube amp just will not do that.  They are just not designed for amplifying acoustic guitars.

So having said that, I can't suggest any tube amp.  If you can get beyond the tube amp requirement a simple, very natural sounding amp with a 1/4" and XLR input, a few nice effects is the Fishman Loudbox series.  I use the Fishman solo amp 220.  It's sort of a poor mans Bose.  Stick array, easy to set up, great sound.  And a bonus, Fishman has great customer service.  But it's overkill for what you want.  The smaller loudbox series will do the job very well, but it will not be a tube amp.

26
Here is some info on your D12

D12
- dreadnought style, spruce top, round soundhole, black pickguard, three-stripe bound body and rosette, mahogany back/sides/neck, 14/20-fret rosewood fingerboard with pearl dot inlay, rosewood bridge with pearl dot black pins, three-per-side chrome diecast tuners, available in Black, Brown, Natural, White, Woodstone Blue (1990-91 only), or Woodstone Brown (1990-91 only) finish, mfg. late 1970s-1994.
Grading 100% Excellent Average
N/A $150 - 200 $80 - 100
Last MSR was $350.

and some serial # info

Either the first 2 digits, or the first digit, are typically used to identify the year of manufacture.
For example, 8901827 indicate the instrument was made in 1989, 1988, or 1998. Instruments with serial numbers that have 5 or more characters are from the late 1980's-2000's
Instruments with serial numbers that have 5 characters or less are typically from the 1980's.
Instruments with serial numbers that have 4 characters are from the 1970's and early 1980's.
For instruments produced after 2010, usually the first 4 digits can indicate the year of manufacture.
There is no serial number information or tracking capability for pre-1978 models.

Finally, the martin style peg head lasted from the mid 70's to the mid 80's.  Then, the "V" style came on the scene.  The 6 digit serial number and the martin style peg head is confusing. 


27
Welcome to the forum.  Your D62 S 12 string is a very well built 12'er.  Likely made in the Yamaki factory which produced some of the better Washburns during the short lived, MIJ period.  Comp sales are hard to come by but $450, assuming it's in good shape is likely a fair price.


28
Festival Series / Re: Cleaning and care advice
« on: April 06, 2017, 08:54:51 PM »
Welcome to the forum.  If the fret board is really dirty with mold involved I would first use a specific fretboard cleaner.  Lots of brands available, all will do the job.  An old toothbrush is a good cleaning tool.  After the fretboard is clean then a light coat of oil is a good idea.  Lots of opinions about what type of oil.  Lemon oil, bore oil, mineral oil all have people who swear "that's the only thing to use".  I would also guess the frets will need a leveling and/or polishing.

Re: string gauge.  I would suggest you start with a very light 12 string set.  Once your fingers have toughened up a bit then you can switch to a higher gauge.

Finally.  Given the guitar has sat for a long period it's very likely it needs a pro set up.  That will involve adjusting the saddle, the neck relief, etc..  They will also handle all of the above.  The difference in playability will be VERY significant.

29
I have made a replacement chicklet style saddle.  In my case for a EA20.  The white pieces do sit in a black plastic carrier.  Then the whole assembly sits in the bridge, on a UST.  Having said all that I think you could make 6 individual pieces that sit directly into the bridge, on top of the UST, w/o the black plastic carrier.  As long as the contact points  (where the individual white pieces make contact with the strings) are in the right spot you should be fine.  It's tricky even with the carrier.  The angle of each piece is slightly different.  If the guitar has good intonation now, then it's a simple matter of replicating each piece.  You could also cut a single piece, more conventional saddle.  Again, you just need to make sure each contact point is in the right spot.

I made my pieces from bone and used a  dremel tool to cut each piece.  It was a bit tedious, but not technically hard.

One other thought, even if you have Colossi cut new pieces you will likely need to do a bit of hand sanding to get the action and intonation correct.

30
Here is the Blue book skinny..

EA22 NUNO BETTENCOURT LIMITED EDITION
- single sharp cutaway folk style, spruce top, oval soundhole, bound body, five-stripe purfling, ninestripe rosette, mahogany back/sides/neck, 21-fret bound rosewood fingerboard with pearl wings inlay, rosewood bridge with white black dot pins, bound blackface peghead with screened signature/logo, three-per-side chrome Grover tuners, acoustic bridge pickup, volume/tone control, 3-band EQ, numbered commemorative metal plate inside body, available in Black finish, mfg. 1992-94.  Note: at least one white in existence.  Labeled “Platinum Edition”  1991 build date.
Grading 100% Excellent Average
N/A $475 - 550 $300 - 350
Last MSR was $1,000.

Your estimate of about 1,500 models built is as good a guess as any.  Washburn did not keep very good records of that kind of info.  The bad news for you is the demand for these guitars is not what it used to be.  The Blue Book value has been at best static for years.  But BB values are not always a good indicator as the number of guitars sold is so small.  So getting an accurate average is difficult.  Best guess, assuming the guitar is in really great shape you might get $550. 

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 127