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Author Topic: Identification needed  (Read 1863 times)

Offline jascime

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Identification needed
« on: October 17, 2008, 03:18:58 PM »
Hello there:

I've got this old Washburn with brazilian b/s that I intend to refurb in hopes of it becoming my main player (see link at bottom of posting - sorry for the long address!).

I'd appreciate any help you can give in identifying this guitar.

Also, for those with experience, what finish did Lyon & Healy use on these guitars?  This one has a very rough finish - a lot like many old pianos I've seen - and needs work.  Any thoughts here are also welcomed.

Thanks very much in advance,

John Scime in Ottawa, Canada

    http://www.auctiva.com/hostedimages/showimage.aspx?gid=801078&image=173300278&images=173300278,173300289,173300300,173300305,173300319,173300331,173300347,173300357,173300372,173300388,173300399,173300408,173300426,173300438,173300456,173300466&formats=0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0&format=0
John Scime
Ottawa, CANADA

Offline Pike

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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2008, 04:57:20 PM »
Hi John, welcome to the forum. Sweet old Washburn. There are folks here who own and know about these. They'll be along. Oh, and keef's book on these older Washburns might interest you. Washburn Prewar Instrument Styles An internet search will locate it for you.

« Last Edit: October 17, 2008, 05:02:23 PM by Pike »
 

Offline jascime

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« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2008, 09:56:40 PM »
Thanks, Pike.  I've been lurking on this site for a few months, and have come across reference to Keef's book - I ordered it yesterday through amazon!  

I also have a Lyon & Healy Lakeside that is similar to this Washburn (same neck and headstock, but maple; similar bracing), but about an inch bigger across both bouts.  Its mahogany. Both guitars are in pieces right now, but the work is coming along.

Thanks for your encouragement!
John Scime
Ottawa, CANADA

Offline strumsalot

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« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2008, 11:55:31 PM »
John, look through the sound hole at the brace. There may be a model number or style stamped there.



It's just below the label here, sort of hard to see.

And, on the top of the headstock, there also may be a number stamped there.

Your parlor looks similar to mine, Style 1897 New Model.


Offline nogin007

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« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2008, 09:23:18 AM »
Strumsalot, I like the way you have your guitars, and other gear, listed. Very neat, and doesn't take up a lot of space.
 

Offline strumsalot

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« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2008, 10:58:37 AM »
John, here are some better photos.



The 207094 is the serial number. The 111 is on all the Style 1897 models which were made between 1897 and 1905.

Hope this helps. Keef is the resident expert here on the oldies, and his book will be a good resource.

quote:
Originally posted by nogin007

Strumsalot, I like the way you have your guitars, and other gear, listed. Very neat, and doesn't take up a lot of space.


Thanks nogin, when I upload to photobucket, I have it set to automatically reduce the images to 320 x 240. It helps those with slower internet connections, and I hate having to scroll side to side to read a post below a huge pic.

Offline keef

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« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2008, 02:24:51 PM »
That looks like a Style 1222 which dates back to 1915-1921. I've got one of these too. Cheapest Washburn guitar style at the time, size 2 (the smaller size 1 was standard). You can find a serial number on the neck block.

The 111 number on the photo posted by Strumsalot is the style number of the guitar - 111 was also the cheapest style made between 1897 and 1905.
 

Offline jascime

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« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2008, 02:18:01 PM »
Thanks, gentlemen!  I'll check the serial number and confirm with the book - which is in the mail as we speak!  
John Scime
Ottawa, CANADA

Offline keef

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« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2008, 05:42:29 AM »
Thanks John - by the way, all  writer's royalties are donated to the War Child foundation.

There used to be a paper label with a serial and model number glued inside your guitar, but it's gone. The serial number is also stamped on the neck block on most guitars. It is a Style 1222 though, no doubt about it.

As indicated in the book, this guitar was made during a time that L&H outsourced part of its instrument production to other makers, including Regal. So this may be a Regal made Washburn. I own a 1222 myself and it represents in a number of ways a departure from the earlier Washburn styles that were made by L&H. Some of the materials used and construction methods are notably different on some of the post 1915 guitars as compared to the earlier styles.

The new line of Washburns introduced in 1922 (with the 'smile' bridges) were likely made again in the L&H factory.

Good luck with the restoration!

 

Offline jascime

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« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2008, 09:20:59 AM »
Keef, thanks once again for this information!  And your book is terrific - I've been absorbed in it for a few days now, and it is a terrific resource!  And cudos to you for dontating the royalties - that is a very nice touch and it tells us a lot about you!  

Thanks again.
John Scime
Ottawa, CANADA